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Learn2 Lead – Alan Booth – Advisory Partner – Deloitte Canada

Learn2 Lead – Alan Booth – Advisory Partner – Deloitte Canada

How has COVID-19 impacted Chatham-Kent Health Alliance and what helped them prepare?

 

Podcast:

Transcipt:

Doug Bolger 0:04
So Laurie, you’ve been through our Learn2 Save the Titanic program. How has it prepared you for the Covid-19 crisis?

Lori Marshall 0:14
So I think the Learn2 Save the Titanic program was really a great example of exactly what we’re going through. The first thing that I would observe is that going into the Titanic simulation, everybody knows how that actual real event ended. And so you go into it with a particular paradigm and thinking how it’s gonna happen. And I know that you probably wouldn’t do anything differently than the people who were in the situation. And so I think with respect to the pandemic, in North America, we had the advantage of knowing about the situations in China, in Italy and in healthcare, that’s what we were bracing for and preparing for. And so we basically went in trying to save the passengers when we think about the Titanic and saving the passengers in the ship. So we put all of our effort into saving the acute care facilities, decanting patients, moving patients from the hospital out into long term care, stopping elective surgeries, creating more capacity where we’ve never had it before, in order to be able to anticipate this huge crush of individuals who would need to be admitted for care. And about, you know, a few weeks into it. What we then realized was that the social distancing was making a difference in terms of who was showing up doors, and that, in fact, all of the efforts that we had been putting into creating more and more capacity, were perhaps focused on a different area than where the real issue was now. And for us now, it’s in congregate settings. It’s in long term care, it’s in retirement homes. It’s in shelters, it’s places where people are living. Living closely together where the transmission is happening, and then some with some devastating impacts there. So for me that was very much like the state of the Titanic where we put all of our efforts into trying to save the passengers. And then all of a sudden, we had this aha moment. Well, if we could save the ship, we ended up saving all of the passengers. So there’s been a major pivot, I would say, in terms of healthcare, with respect to moving away from creating more and more capacity in the acute care sector, and moving now more towards how do we help and support those vulnerable populations.

Doug Bolger 2:33
So in terms of your leadership team, and that ability to build on top of each other and really focus in from an idea and translating it into an action has that ability of driving from idea to action impacted how you’ve operated throughout the crisis?

Lori Marshall 2:55
I think that driving from idea to action has been on steroids. Right now, it truly has been this experience itself. I have a relatively new team to one another, some who’ve been here a long time, and others who really just joined the organization. And it’s incredible to me how quickly a crisis galvanizes everyone together, you very quickly come to what the actions are you implement, you move on to the next one. And what I would say is, it was a change for us as hospitals, we normally be very risk averse. We tend to ruminate over decisions a lot. It’s hard for us to do rapid cycle improvement and then move on to something else. And I think this experience has been such that some of the advice we were hearing, particularly I would say from New York, was that, you know, don’t wait around for the perfect solution. Time is what you have to act on right now. If you wait for the perfect solution, it will be too late. And so, you know, we probably put something in place where normally we would say no, we would never ever do that. And we pivoted when we needed to. So I think it actually was a tremendous team building experience unto itself. And now, what we’re going to have to do, though, is to think about when you move out of a pandemic, you can’t stand the command and control kind of structure. And so that I think is going to be a challenge for not only us, but for funders for governments who have enjoyed for this period of time and ability to make and enact decisions very quickly. And you can only do that for that short period of time based on the fact that prior to that you’re very consultative, and afterwards there’s the social contract that you’re going to return to that kind of decision making environment. So That’s going to be the challenge and the shift to know when to make that piece is is going to be a challenge for us.

Doug Bolger 5:07
And I think for a lot of people when they think of COVID, they think of just the human loss and the tragedy. And yet, there’s also a triumph inside of this of galvanizing your team together, doing what’s impossible. How has your team shifted from that tragedy into the triumphs? What are some of the wins that you guys have done?

Lori Marshall 5:33
I think one of the things we’ve done really well in this is communicate. And I for me, that’s a major challenge and one where we’ve had daily memos going out to all of our staff, there are huddles, we’re on the radio four times a week with different radio shows communicating with the community. And it is really it hasn’t just galvanized, I would say our intellect senior leadership team it’s galvanized the entire hospital. And so you know things like if a lights on in an office late at night somebody knocking that door just to check in and how are you? Right? I those kinds of things in a normal environment probably wouldn’t be happening. But there is very much this caretaking, I would say that has happened within the full organization. And people are saying thank you to one another. And it’s, it’s really very heartening to see.

Doug Bolger 6:34
And have you been able to prevent this spread locally?

Lori Marshall 6:40
So I think our community’s actually done very well. We’ve had very, very few cases in the community. We’ve only ever had a total of four admissions to the hospital and a population size of 100,000 people. We’ve worked very well with our public health organization. In, in our community, and that partnership, some of the decisions that have been made there to close down some things earlier than other jurisdictions, I have, I think actually made quite a difference. We’ve had no outbreaks in the organization, so no transmission from patients to staff or staff to staff, which again, helps us in terms of people feeling confident, and their safety is being looked after safety is one of our values. And we’ve gone out of our way, I would say to make sure that staff and physicians know that that’s our commitment to them, we are not going to send them into an unsafe situation. And that gives them the confidence of knowing that they can care for patients the way that they do.

Doug Bolger 7:46
Well, we’d be remiss if we didn’t say thank you, because I know quite often, being the CEO is a thankless job and your leadership has certainly protected your community and prepared your hospital. allowed that group to galvanize around and just on behalf of all of us, the community and the business world and society at large thank you to you and your team for everything you’ve done.

Lori Marshall 8:14
Thank you

WHO’S LEARN2?

We’re Learn2, and it’s our mission to change the way the world works. We would love for you to join us in that mission. Here’s what to do, see this link?  It’s for a quick 10 question assessment that will give you deep insight into your natural communication style. You’re going to love it. You need to do it, click the link and take the assessment, trust me. After that I really hope you’ll consider working with us, we create amazing results for our clients and would love the opportunity to do the same for you.

Learn2 Lead – Learn2 Lead – Lori Marshall – President and CEO of Chatham-Kent Health Alliance

Learn2 Lead – Learn2 Lead – Lori Marshall – President and CEO of Chatham-Kent Health Alliance

How has COVID-19 impacted Chatham-Kent Health Alliance and what helped them prepare?

 

Podcast:

Transcipt:

Doug Bolger 0:04
So Laurie, you’ve been through our Learn2 Save the Titanic program. How has it prepared you for the Covid-19 crisis?

Lori Marshall 0:14
So I think the Learn2 Save the Titanic program was really a great example of exactly what we’re going through. The first thing that I would observe is that going into the Titanic simulation, everybody knows how that actual real event ended. And so you go into it with a particular paradigm and thinking how it’s gonna happen. And I know that you probably wouldn’t do anything differently than the people who were in the situation. And so I think with respect to the pandemic, in North America, we had the advantage of knowing about the situations in China, in Italy and in healthcare, that’s what we were bracing for and preparing for. And so we basically went in trying to save the passengers when we think about the Titanic and saving the passengers in the ship. So we put all of our effort into saving the acute care facilities, decanting patients, moving patients from the hospital out into long term care, stopping elective surgeries, creating more capacity where we’ve never had it before, in order to be able to anticipate this huge crush of individuals who would need to be admitted for care. And about, you know, a few weeks into it. What we then realized was that the social distancing was making a difference in terms of who was showing up doors, and that, in fact, all of the efforts that we had been putting into creating more and more capacity, were perhaps focused on a different area than where the real issue was now. And for us now, it’s in congregate settings. It’s in long term care, it’s in retirement homes. It’s in shelters, it’s places where people are living. Living closely together where the transmission is happening, and then some with some devastating impacts there. So for me that was very much like the state of the Titanic where we put all of our efforts into trying to save the passengers. And then all of a sudden, we had this aha moment. Well, if we could save the ship, we ended up saving all of the passengers. So there’s been a major pivot, I would say, in terms of healthcare, with respect to moving away from creating more and more capacity in the acute care sector, and moving now more towards how do we help and support those vulnerable populations.

Doug Bolger 2:33
So in terms of your leadership team, and that ability to build on top of each other and really focus in from an idea and translating it into an action has that ability of driving from idea to action impacted how you’ve operated throughout the crisis?

Lori Marshall 2:55
I think that driving from idea to action has been on steroids. Right now, it truly has been this experience itself. I have a relatively new team to one another, some who’ve been here a long time, and others who really just joined the organization. And it’s incredible to me how quickly a crisis galvanizes everyone together, you very quickly come to what the actions are you implement, you move on to the next one. And what I would say is, it was a change for us as hospitals, we normally be very risk averse. We tend to ruminate over decisions a lot. It’s hard for us to do rapid cycle improvement and then move on to something else. And I think this experience has been such that some of the advice we were hearing, particularly I would say from New York, was that, you know, don’t wait around for the perfect solution. Time is what you have to act on right now. If you wait for the perfect solution, it will be too late. And so, you know, we probably put something in place where normally we would say no, we would never ever do that. And we pivoted when we needed to. So I think it actually was a tremendous team building experience unto itself. And now, what we’re going to have to do, though, is to think about when you move out of a pandemic, you can’t stand the command and control kind of structure. And so that I think is going to be a challenge for not only us, but for funders for governments who have enjoyed for this period of time and ability to make and enact decisions very quickly. And you can only do that for that short period of time based on the fact that prior to that you’re very consultative, and afterwards there’s the social contract that you’re going to return to that kind of decision making environment. So That’s going to be the challenge and the shift to know when to make that piece is is going to be a challenge for us.

Doug Bolger 5:07
And I think for a lot of people when they think of COVID, they think of just the human loss and the tragedy. And yet, there’s also a triumph inside of this of galvanizing your team together, doing what’s impossible. How has your team shifted from that tragedy into the triumphs? What are some of the wins that you guys have done?

Lori Marshall 5:33
I think one of the things we’ve done really well in this is communicate. And I for me, that’s a major challenge and one where we’ve had daily memos going out to all of our staff, there are huddles, we’re on the radio four times a week with different radio shows communicating with the community. And it is really it hasn’t just galvanized, I would say our intellect senior leadership team it’s galvanized the entire hospital. And so you know things like if a lights on in an office late at night somebody knocking that door just to check in and how are you? Right? I those kinds of things in a normal environment probably wouldn’t be happening. But there is very much this caretaking, I would say that has happened within the full organization. And people are saying thank you to one another. And it’s, it’s really very heartening to see.

Doug Bolger 6:34
And have you been able to prevent this spread locally?

Lori Marshall 6:40
So I think our community’s actually done very well. We’ve had very, very few cases in the community. We’ve only ever had a total of four admissions to the hospital and a population size of 100,000 people. We’ve worked very well with our public health organization. In, in our community, and that partnership, some of the decisions that have been made there to close down some things earlier than other jurisdictions, I have, I think actually made quite a difference. We’ve had no outbreaks in the organization, so no transmission from patients to staff or staff to staff, which again, helps us in terms of people feeling confident, and their safety is being looked after safety is one of our values. And we’ve gone out of our way, I would say to make sure that staff and physicians know that that’s our commitment to them, we are not going to send them into an unsafe situation. And that gives them the confidence of knowing that they can care for patients the way that they do.

Doug Bolger 7:46
Well, we’d be remiss if we didn’t say thank you, because I know quite often, being the CEO is a thankless job and your leadership has certainly protected your community and prepared your hospital. allowed that group to galvanize around and just on behalf of all of us, the community and the business world and society at large thank you to you and your team for everything you’ve done.

Lori Marshall 8:14
Thank you

WHO’S LEARN2?

We’re Learn2, and it’s our mission to change the way the world works. We would love for you to join us in that mission. Here’s what to do, see this link?  It’s for a quick 10 question assessment that will give you deep insight into your natural communication style. You’re going to love it. You need to do it, click the link and take the assessment, trust me. After that I really hope you’ll consider working with us, we create amazing results for our clients and would love the opportunity to do the same for you.

Learn2 Lead – Impact on Engagement and Diversity with Unlimited Talent

Learn2 Lead – Impact on Engagement and Diversity with Unlimited Talent

When employees can find jobs globally and employers can find talent globally what happens to employee engagement and diversity?

We find out in this episode of Learn2 Lead.

 

Podcast:

Transcipt:

Tom Lyons 0:04
Hi, everybody, it’s Tom Lyons here from Learn2 and I’m here with, with Mary who is our consultive expert on all things HR and culture. And I’m here with Samantha who is our account manager. For Learn2, she looks after some of our greatest clients, which are all of them. Today, I wanted to take the time to talk about impact on home working, that’s something that we’re doing a lot of, and the mental health of that impact with your team because there are a lot of changes going on. So to dig into it, teams have been working remotely, we’ve been seeing that a lot. And we see the impact. with everybody of not being as social as what they could actually be like we’re all tied at home, we don’t get to visit our friends. What we don’t see or what we haven’t seen is the impact of needing to take on watching the kids still trying to get your work done needing to do extra shopping for your parents and grandparents. There’s all these extra things that have been taken on. Start with Mary, how do you help employees through that? Because it’s a big change for them?

Mary Bean 1:04
Yeah. I think the first thing is to acknowledge it. So that this is not like working from home? Because I can, because I want to, it’s because we have to. And all those things you mentioned, Tom Absolutely Right. So most people are dealing with home schooling kids, but actually doing homeschooling with their kids and the workload. And in some cases, the workload has increased. Other times it has just it has decreased or often has just shifted in the context of COVID. And there are also this additional stressor, it’s a we are all under this latent, constant level of unrest, I’m sure does have anxiety in anybody. So that’s true forever, all of us. So productivity levels are impacted by that. And if you add that into anybody who has already existing challenges with feeling anxious, this just escalates even further, and anybody who still has a job is certainly feeling very grateful that they have one. And they’re also wondering, do I have one tomorrow or weeks time or a month’s time? How fast? I think the first thing is just acknowledging that and adjusting timelines and expectations accordingly,

Tom Lyons 2:15
Really good time to bring out that empathy skill. And we talked about that as a leadership skill all the time. But now is the real time to pull that empathy out and go there are there are things going on that I’m probably not completely aware of. And I need to be sensitive even even in that ignorance of what I don’t know. Right, and that there are other things to go, which means I’ve got to talk to my people. I’ve got to talk to my teams. I’ve got to find out what’s going on in their personal life and then figure out how we work around those sort of things. Yeah, that sort of hits pretty close with you, Sam, because you’ve got a lot of things going on. I mean, we know that you have a young daughter, we know that you’ve got lots of pets. You’ve got a husband that’s been at home for a while, but you’ve been seeing this with your clients. You can see it with your co workers. What’s your perspective.

Samantha Schumyn 3:02
My perspective is we didn’t expect this, we expected this pandemic to last a week or two.

So in those first couple of weeks, people were excited to have to work. A Yeah, I get to work from home.

We’re moving, we’re changing. It’s exciting. And then that leg effect comes right? You’ve got all this adrenaline, you’ve got all this. Go, go go. And now it’s kind of like, Oh, this is our new normal. And just going back to what you said earlier, Tom, I had a call with a client earlier today and she really hit the nail on the head and said, How are you dealing as a human through all of this? So yes, we have all our skills and but how is how is humanity coming out of this? So I have really noticed a shift in clients. Definitely a lot of my clients have kids, so yes, very You’re right. I’m doing a call at 10 o’clock at night. I’m I have clients with a kid bouncing on their bed. We have, you know, people working in the gardens in thier everything and people keep apologizing. And I think we need to come to a point where this is normal. They get through it. If you need to have that class one at 10 o’clock meeting, go for it. If you have a screaming kid in the background, I get it. You know, how can we support each other? What are your strong moments? What are not my strong moments? And how can we come together and again, a human word to work through at all.

Tom Lyons 4:32
That’s a really good point. I noticed. I noticed a lot of stories coming out in video meetings lately, because you’re right, one of their kids comes running into the room, or the dog comes running into the room. We see a lot more pets in the video conferences than we do and people seem to be sorry for that. But the reality is, is life is meshed like this really tightly right now. And so we have to have the expectation that it’s meshed right?

Samantha Schumyn 4:59
Definitely. And you know, Tom, you and I and Mary, you also work from home most of the time. So I have an office not many people have an office since got people like kitchen tables, we’ve got all you know, at wherever they can from the kids, or the kids or they don’t have that structured space of an office. So I’m all for it. I love getting to know every single part of my my clients lives. And I enjoyed the dogs, cats, kids and everything else in between.

Tom Lyons 5:28
Okay, well, let’s move on to culture, culture drives productivity, culture drives innovation, culture drives profit within the company, but this change has this unique effect or impact on culture. People culture used to be defined by how do you bring people together a lot like that’s how people thought of it. And because how they came together, and how you treated them personally together, right? Define how the company worked together. Now they’re not together. What tips can you give for holding a great culture together if you had one, and now it’s hard because the people aren’t together as much. And then if you were, if you’re still trying to create your culture or improve your culture, what tips exist in a remote world to help that happen? And I’ll start with you, Mary.

Mary Bean 6:12
Okay, so two things. One is you’re going to find out real fast, what kind of culture you really have in the world that we’re living in. Now, there’s a lot of room for I’m not doing well. Now, there might have argued that that should always have been the case. I’m not sure that it was. And so some of the lessons that we’re learning now from that human part, hopefully people will actually continue on with those pieces, because that is the part that I think this vulnerability that we we know is important for leadership we know that you choose shows courage and shows the human side of us, we have not had to do that people have chosen to go down that road and certainly the Brene Brown followers would know what I’m talking about. But we haven’t all this is a world even those that are not comfortable has almost been forced into that cultural perspective, I be thinking about what are you intentional about? And what are you consistent about? I have a client that talks about this all the time. And I shamelessly borrowed those two words from him over the last year being consistent and intentional over and over again. And so in the past, you might have said, Oh, we’ve got a great culture, look around. It’s you know, people are talking working well together. And maybe it just happened that way. And I would say, if it just happened, you got lucky. So good cultures are not done by this, this organic sort of, we’ll just kind of see what happens. It’s an intentional piece, those things are put in place with a mindset to what are what is the vibe that we’re trying to get aligned with our work? Those that have not done that work? It’s not all it’s not lost? If we have to be intentional because we’re not having that bump into you on the way to the lunchroom or the washroom or as we’re entering the building. What do you want to be intentional about? How do we want to start conversations, how do we want to look at our work? We want to adjust our expectations.

Tom Lyons 7:58
How do you measure that because it’s one thing to go, okay, you need to be more intentional about it. You need to go about and make it make an effort to pay attention and be consistent about it. But one, I suspect, you need to create a benchmark around it, right? And then you need to be able to take that benchmark and then measure against it later to see whether or not what you’re doing is having the desired impact just as you would with almost any metric.

Mary Bean 8:22
So you start with the why you start with what is the purpose of like what we’re trying to do here? Everybody says the same thing. We want better communication, we want better collaboration, okay, what does that mean for us. We always start with? How are you doing? Expectation is a combined expectation. If I’m the leader, it isn’t just up to me, I’ve included in this case, both Tom and Sam, and what I’m intending to do, and I’m going to say, look, it’s not my habit, but I’m really going to work hard at just checking in with you first. And so at a meeting, if I don’t do that, please remind me I want to I’m really trying to make a habit change here. So you just you just say it,

Tom Lyons 8:58
There is a level of authenticity that It goes along with it too, because otherwise, the response that comes back is well, how are you doing? I’m fine, right? Because an individual won’t be vulnerable with you unless as their leader, you’re at least authentic to some degree on that. They believe that you’re asking because you truly care about their well being as opposed to checklist.

Mary Bean 9:17
That’s right. So you could ask a simple question like, how’d you sleep last night? It was a beautiful day here. Did you go for a walk yesterday. There are questions you can ask that aren’t so personal that you’ve overstepped. But if somebody’s not getting a good night’s sleep, and not getting some level of walk, even people walk from the GO train or the subway or their car, they’re not doing any of those things, right. So are you getting outside? Could you have a walking meeting? Could we say listen, let’s have a conversation and let’s both put on our headphones and our put our phones in our pockets. Nice world we are living in right and go for a walk together and have our conversation then right. So change it up a little bit.

Tom Lyons 9:53
Let’s talk about how the other day Mary and I we were having a specific talk about a topic and it was around how work in the remote world is going to change the talent pool. And it changes the employment options people have. So there’s this flip side, now companies have this choice, that if they realize that they can be productive, and they can get stuff done with remote workers, you don’t have to hire geographically close to you. You could hire in a different country, you could hire in a different state, you could hire in a different province, you could hire in a different city. You don’t have to just take the resumes that come your way. But the flip side to that and for companies too, is that employees have more options now to as soon as companies realize that you can have remote workers, I can apply to somebody in Los Angeles if I live in New York, and I don’t have to move to Los Angeles. Right? I can be working in a small town in Ontario, Canada, and I can work for a company down in Florida. What does the world start to look like for teams and industry?

Samantha Schumyn 11:00
And this is why resume versus hiring for fit is so good. When people when you’ve opened up that, that pool of knowledge, you know, these are the certain amount of people I have. And I’m sure they are really great. It’s going back to culture, what is your culture? And how are you hiring perfect, so that conversations flow easy. standards at the company can be easy, you know, this is why it’s important to learn to, you need to fit in with it and I know need sounds like a really strong word. It’s just that when there are times like this pandemic, it’s easier to shift. It’s gonna be difficult to everyone else. And we still have the same values. Family is important downtime is important and pivoting to a new normal is important, and we’re all on that same path. So I love the idea of being able to open up that that hiring pool. The more the merrier if you think about it, and you have access to great talent out there, all over the world.

Tom Lyons 12:07
So Mary, does that change diversity, diversity, in part was driven also by geographic, geographical or demographical I should say, democratical makeup of the area. In fact, some company’s policies around diversity hiring are based on the same to have the same number of diversity that exists within their demographic area. Right? Well, if you’re, if you’re a pool now is the entire world. You pretty much have to throw that type of policy out and go, we’re hiring. We’re hiring based on a different type of need or a different type of style of diversity.

Mary Bean 12:48
I mean, we’ll see. I mean, diversity is really as core differences, be some differences, we see other differences we experience. I think the other piece will be the harder probably inclusion So that if you have a growth mindset and a diversity mindset that you want differences, you probably already have that. And maybe if you live in a homogeneous community, that now you have opportunity to hire beyond that, because not to be actually in your, in your four walls. That’s great. And but now inclusion becomes a bigger issue. So inclusion is think about diversity as I got the invitation to the party, but when I got there, I got invited to dance like that’s inclusion that’s the difference. So that how do I people feel included in the context of those pieces? Right? So yes, we’re different. How do I get involved with those pieces? Especially so for somebody who’s sitting a little bit on the outside of that you may have somebody who’s not working full time all the time, or is somebody who you work with and you bring out certain projects, how do you have them feel they’re part of the whole team,

Tom Lyons 13:47
You can’t have benefit from diversity, if you don’t have inclusion, because you can have as a diverse group is possible but if they do not feel included, if they do not feel valued, they’re probably going to just leave, right? That’s just a given. If I don’t feel I’m valued and included, then I’m going to leave. But if they’re not included, they’re not going to share. They’re not going to provide the mental diversity that you’re trying to create, which is what drives innovation. All the companies that are good at this have fantastic innovation because they have all these different minds thinking in different ways coming up with different solutions for different problems, you don’t get that if they’re not included.

Mary Bean 14:27
If they’re different and separate, then you haven’t, elevated the differences. You’ve just said, you’re different. You’re different than I am, and I’ve hired you great, but we haven’t got a good understanding of how those differences are going to help move the business forward. And if we don’t have that connection, it’s not just applied knowledge. You can have a lot of knowledge about something but if you can’t make that work for your organization, it’s not worth very much.

Tom Lyons 14:52
Sam and we’ve covered a lot of stuff today. What for you, what are the first steps that companies need to do to prepare for The changes that are still coming, lots of changes already happened. There’s more changes still to come. And then what do you do now for the changes that have already occurred?

Unknown Speaker 15:08
Great question, Tom. And I think that goes back to the beginning of our conversation is values, you know, is everybody you know your values and is your big picture. So the thing is, your company’s still driving towards the same goals. It’s now more than ever important to have great leaders are your leaders able to lead in these times of change, everybody wants a message from the top, the top is still the top. And that top has the different layers of leaders underneath to drive those teams. So it’s really important not to have that strategy of the new normal, get that value, get that culture set up and speak to your team, ask for that feedback. Now figure out that why go back to that why. And then work on your what and you’ll

Mary Bean 15:55
know about some of the indicators that you run your business that helped you know, with Things are changing and pay attention to those. I wouldn’t worry about what’s going to happen later. I’m worried about think about what’s happening now. Yeah, that’s all we can control right now is where we’re at. And it’s a super hard thing for those of us that are like, used to planning out and we got, we all had plans before this happened. And so it’s like, go back and look at those plans, or any of those plans still fall in the context of COVID in my business.

Tom Lyons 16:22
Okay, well, this was fan. Fantastic. Thank you both for taking the time and good luck. We’re all busy. We got lots going on. But I think this is important information to get out there. So I appreciate you guys taking the time with me to answer those questions.

Unknown Speaker 16:33
Thanks, Tom.

WHO’S LEARN2?

We’re Learn2, and it’s our mission to change the way the world works. We would love for you to join us in that mission. Here’s what to do, see this link?  It’s for a quick 10 question assessment that will give you deep insight into your natural communication style. You’re going to love it. You need to do it, click the link and take the assessment, trust me. After that I really hope you’ll consider working with us, we create amazing results for our clients and would love the opportunity to do the same for you.

Learn2 Lead – Putting Impact First With Leadership Skills

Learn2 Lead – Putting Impact First With Leadership Skills

What happens when you treat leadership skills like hard skills and design your programs around the impact you are trying to create.

We find out in this episode of Learn2 Lead.

 

Podcast:

Transcipt:

Tom Lyons 0:04
Hi e verybody, it’s Tom Lyons here from Learn2 and we’re here with Carrie Millen our lead facilitator and Doug Bolger, our CEO. Many of you know him as well. And we’re here to talk about soft skills and specifically about soft skills and impact. For instance, if I was trying to learn to type, I would either take a course, I would get some software, I would then go in and I would practice it, and I would be able to measure it. And I would know when I’m becoming competent with that skill, but with soft skills, we see a completely different approach. Why is that?

Carrie Millen 0:34
Great question, Tom. Often that is because learning and development, if you think about how or why their teams were originally created, and how it’s very much back in the industrial age, you created a skill ultimately to help with safety and they were very focused on the end result. Now often learning gets direction from up top that we need to develop leadership skills and they aren’t given the difference. So they try to put in many great pieces that they think together without having that direct line to what’s the real impact in the business? Because in most cases, the business actually doesn’t know what that impact is. They just know they need it

Doug Bolger 1:14
Without being clear on what the outcome is the terminal outcome in our language, like, are we raising dollars per FTE? Unless you have that measure and metric, your leadership development is literally just sprayed without a focus

Tom Lyons 1:32
It’s like we know we need leadership skills. But if it was any other skill, there’d be an assessment it would be we need this specific thing to accomplish this specific thing. So you touched on that a little bit and I’d like you to go a little deeper, if you can.

Doug Bolger 1:44
Yes, said differently on the assessment, I would say it’s like, what’s the gap? What’s being measured, like in this leadership program, we want to impact this by this amount by this date. So incredibly clear our million dollar Leadership Program, that one that’s now been adopted into the nine digital modules. That program literally has you pick, here’s the impact I want to make, here’s how I’m going to measure it. And so we don’t even consider that most of the time in the learning and development, talent development hypo programs, we go in to focus in on the person and to me that’s developing leadership, versus helping people learn to lead by actually leading to an actual outcome.

Tom Lyons 2:37
So Carrie, I’m gonna ask, I’m gonna direct this one directly to you. Okay, in our industry. Yep. Over the last several years, we’ve seen this increase in in companies saying that we are spending a lot on leadership development. We feel like a lot of it is going down the drain. And I think it’s a big part of that is because we don’t put impact first and then tie what type of learning needs to go to drive that impact? So what do you think the biggest challenge is for companies to overcome that tendency?

Carrie Millen 3:11
I think the biggest way to overcome that tendency is, is for learning and development to learn how to actually take a backseat in this and actually put the ownership on the learners. Often, you know, we said they don’t do an assessment, often, an assessment is done, and we get a high level I want to do this, but there’s no connection to me as a learner. Learning and development needs to actually get out of the way and realize you hired amazing freaking employees, give them the power and the ownership to make a difference. And the tools to in turn make that difference. Then you will see it drive performance. And so it’s a real mind shift and change in responsibility because they used to be police in control, and now they hold the space for other people to learn and make that impact.

Doug Bolger 4:00
I think that’s well said, I think the the challenge for us is that we most the people in our industry, we believe in the inherent value of helping people and supporting people and developing people, which is great. And then you have a crisis like this that comes along where people are just like, well, that’s great, but it’s actually not going to help us achieve our business outcomes. And that’s, I think the root of some of our challenges is we’ve been focused on the content. And we keep telling and developing content, buying content, really, you want to focus on the process.

Tom Lyons 4:40
It’s this concept of competence, right where people don’t leave a classroom competent they leave a classroom knowledgeable.

Carrie Millen 4:49
And, Tom to add on to what you said, it’s, it’s applying those skills and getting up to a competence level and most importantly, learning how to recover and recover without an instructor. Getting over you to telling you what the keystrokes you’re supposed to have. Being able to self recover and use your peers is so important.

Tom Lyons 5:06
Let’s move to something super relevant right now, which is leadership development. But it’s one thing to talk about development and leadership skills. Like two months ago, it’s another thing to talk about leadership development skills in this crazy world right now, like this level of uncertainty that so many companies are going through what change has to occur, both in leadership development, and what change has to occur in the way that we lead in this new environment.

Carrie Millen 5:34
I alluded to it a little earlier. Ownership is a huge portion you used to have your staff here, now your staff are all spread apart. They’re keeping the ship afloat, probably working more hours than they were before. And really want a purpose, really want a reason to be there. So giving them that ownership and that empowerment to make a difference. On top of giving them the skills to be able to do that. That’ll create their own little businesses that their own running, they’re driving forward with that kind of activity. It’s that ownership. A, you don’t have to control it all. They’re amazing. Allow them to make ripple effects within the business.

Doug Bolger 6:16
I would say that there’s never been a time where we’re more CEO of our own role. Now we’re really intentional about how we organize our time who’s on the call, what’s the purpose of the call? What’s the outcome of the call? So I think we’re seeing a lot more intention and getting clear. Which ties back to Carrie’s point of like, what is the purpose? And right now, the main things I think leaders have to do is just get a super clear purpose.

Tom Lyons 6:47
This is a real opportunity, though, because for engagement to occur, you would think it’s the opposite because they’re they were moving them outward, but Carrie really hit it on the head, where now you have this chance to engage them in an and make them understand their role is actually really important. They have a strong purpose within the company that maybe they didn’t feel before because they were more controlled, right?

Carrie Millen 7:10
Absolutely. Often it’s out of sight out of mind, what an incredible opportunity is now to get noticed by a lot of people in the business. And also when you make an impact, and you are lower down in the hierarchy of a company, not only does that impact help me in my performance for the year, it helps my manager, skip leader and up, it actually has a huge cascading impact. It’ll help our team and so much more.

Doug Bolger 7:35
You’re speaking to like a program we ran on Wednesday, one of the participants went in and said the impact I want to make is I want to fix this process. It doesn’t work. Well what’s the impact of that throughput is going to increase dramatically. And number of amount of rework is going to change dramatically. This lead with which we’re able to service, an upset or frustrated customer is going to shorten dramatically. You walk out with three core measures on a project you’ve just implemented and annualize those savings into the tune of millions of dollars, you’re going to get noticed by not just your leader, your leader’s leader, because everyone up through that chain to the executives is going to hear about your leadership, your future inside that organization. It’s different now.

Tom Lyons 8:34
So pulling this back in, what closing advice do you have for companies regarding both leading and their leadership programs today, their leadership development programs, what should they do?

Doug Bolger 8:44
Focus in on the process of actually producing impact. And that means that all the content stuff that all these leadership development, people want to give a lot of that needs to fall away and it needs to be become outcome focused with measurement and a lot of accountability. That means you can move to that very quickly.

Carrie Millen 9:09
Trust that you hired amazing people and they’re super talented. And just give them a few of the tools and they’re gonna build the future that you want.

Tom Lyons 9:18
Completely. Okay, my closing advice. Call us! Call Learn2, that is my advice for you. We we know how to do that assessment. We know how to help you through those those problems. We know how to create the impact that you’re looking for out of your leadership development. We have the programs that work online in a world where you can’t bring them together. We have those solutions. So my advice is call us. Okay. Thank you.

Carrie Millen 9:44
Thanks a lot.

Doug Bolger 9:45
Thanks, Tom.

WHO’S LEARN2?

We’re Learn2, and it’s our mission to change the way the world works. We would love for you to join us in that mission. Here’s what to do, see this link?  It’s for a quick 10 question assessment that will give you deep insight into your natural communication style. You’re going to love it. You need to do it, click the link and take the assessment, trust me. After that I really hope you’ll consider working with us, we create amazing results for our clients and would love the opportunity to do the same for you.

Learn2 Lead – Building Inclusion with Remote Teams?

Learn2 Lead – Building Inclusion with Remote Teams?

Transcipt:

Tom Lyons 0:05
So welcome to Learn2. We’re doing a video podcast today, talking a little bit about what’s happening in the world. Absolutely crazy stuff with Covid 19. Numbers are still, of course rising with the virus here. But the impact on businesses has been dramatic to say the least. I can’t say that. So I’m here with Doug Bolger, CEO of Learn2, to talk a little bit about how this is impacting one our company, of course, and things that we’re doing and then what it’s doing for our clients, and then maybe a little bit of advice from you on what you think should be happening. How’s that sound?

Doug Bolger 0:41
Sounds great. So what’s happening in our business, about three years ago, we started shifting our core product Learn2 Save the Titanic over to digital as we started to see things happening globally, as the infections increased by country by country, we, we started putting our finishing touches on that program and got that pushed out.

Tom Lyons 1:10
What are some of the unique challenges that we now face, Learn2 and then face our clients? Maybe they haven’t seen because this is a little bit different than a normal unique recession, right?

Doug Bolger 1:24
Yes, this one’s different. I think for most of us, we’ve been wondering about what does the new world of work look like? And I would argue it’s probably now arrived or a good portion of it has arrived. So people have been talking about this for many years, but people spending more time on conference calls, video conferencing, augmented reality, virtual reality, artificial intelligence, all of these things. These trends have been in place. We’ve seen them in our clients. Now we’re seeing them in our data. Today experienced as leaders and struggling with how do we lead inside these new platforms? How do we think differently? How do we engage our teams differently? How do you leverage your team and get them motivated and inspired to be able to go and do something and you don’t have that face to face or that pull everyone into the conference room moment? So we’re just seeing a lot of clients struggling to get their heads wrapped around? How am I going to do development? How do I set up a simple as a report back most a lot of report backs or conference calls or face to face? Now it’s how do I report back over a platform and what’s that look like? And how do I do it effectively?

Tom Lyons 2:53
Yeah, we used to have this ability, especially in open offices, which became so popular is that you can literally poke your head out You can see everybody that’s there. And you can kind of just walk down the hall and you can say, Hey, how’s it going? what’s, what are you working on? What’s the status of that project? But with everybody being dispersed at this point in time and being in different locations, that ability gets diminished. And now a new form of management needs to take place. So what do you think that looks like?

Doug Bolger 3:21
Well, we’ve been living in it for a while because we have team members in six different locations. I guess seven? If you count home office? Yeah. We, we’ve seen things like, you know, used to put up a flip chart on the wall or a schedule, all those things have gone away. So we’re seeing that shifting into digital. I think we’re even just seeing different behaviors like so we we have something called Beer 30. You don’t have to drink beer, but we all get in zoom. And you can see everyone’s face and we’ve renamed ourselves what we were drinking. I was Green tea. I think you were

Tom Lyons 4:01
Diet Coke. Yeah,

Doug Bolger 4:03
We had a few people who were like knuckleball tried different things. So we had some fun with it half an hour, just face to face, no agenda, just letting people talk. And letting people connect. those connections now are infinitely more important. The implications of exclusion. Is, is I think, just in the future is going to be unbelievable. So this inclusivity How do leaders create inclusivity inside their team where people want to contribute, they feel like that’s their role is to actually contribute. Otherwise, you’re not getting those random bumping into someone. Oh, by the way, guess what’s happening? I thought I’d let you know. I it’s got to be much more intentional now.

Tom Lyons 4:53
Yeah, that was something that as an organization we journey through ourselves because we are different. First across the entire country, and half of the workforce is actually in an office, the other half is somewhere else and being able to not disclude somebody because you don’t see them. Right? This out of sight, out of mind thing had to become an ever present concept for us. Right?

Doug Bolger 5:16
Yes. And and new behaviors then pop up like really thinking about who is this? How is someone implicated? Or what’s the impact on someone of not knowing this information? We created a #bricks channel, that’s been super helpful. We’re always building for new clients. It’s just we’ve been doing it for 30 years. So we’re constantly building these larger, visionary kind of pieces for clients. So because of that, it’s kind of like Rome and Rome was not built in a day. So each brick is acknowledged for being valuable. So we built this #bricks channel that was all about hey, I put these bricks and so everyone was up to date on the bricks. And then we realized that, really the brick is the outcome. And while that’s important, the real brick is I’m making a contribution. And I want to have that contribution recognized. And as certainly as Canadians or North Americans, it’s not always easy for us to go like, look at my brick my bricks, Oh, awesome. It’s a cornerstone brick, we’re going to build this huge thing on this. So what we did was we shifted the intention of the bricks channel to start to recognize other people for laying the bricks. That was transformative for our team.

Tom Lyons 6:42
Yeah, it allowed me It allowed myself to recognize somebody else for something they’ve done for me, or maybe they’ve done for the company, or whatever. So I’m gonna break that down a little bit for the people watching this. When we talked about a bricks channel, we use an application called slack. I think many of you will be familiar with it, but there’s Microsoft teams, Yammer, tools that allow teams to be able to chat remotely and be able to quickly connect via video or by audio. So we use slack and in that we created a channel called hashtag bricks. And and anytime somebody needs to be able to toss a brick out there, they just go to that channel, they toss it out, it’s company wide, so everybody can see it, right? And come and take a look at it. And then everybody tosses an emoji on it, or they make a comment or something like that. And it ends up making people feel really good. Normally, that would happen in the office. And people would say, hey, great job on that. Whatever. But when you’re when you’re dispersed when you’re remote, it was a really transformative thing for organization.

Doug Bolger 7:42
Yeah, I wouldn’t even say like, it’s one of the first things you look at when you go in as soon as you see there’s a brick there. You’re like, Oh, is it me? Who is it and you know, will pile on on the bricks to where like, you know, Carrie has done something that’s really helped someone else in your life. Yeah. And we start having emojis and comments you can also so that leadership is really about creating this culture that allows for us to feel that level of connection. feel included. Often inclusion is this big concept. Really, it comes down to some versus all. Either you’re included or you’re not. And inside being included, that means everyone is included, not some people. So that distinction really is helped us really start to wrap our heads around. And at the same time, you have to balance that off with not everybody needs to be included in every update. every choice. We’ve also had to go. Is this a 411? Is this a 711? Is this a 911 that helps people understand the level of urgency and we’ve organized into channels so that you If you’re involved with a client, you get all the updates on that client. Some of us just have marginal involvement with a client at a specific space and time so we can step out, which has been really effective for just keeping everyone in the know. And included and connected, it’s clearly not always perfect. It’s way better than it was before we started using.

Tom Lyons 9:25
And I think that’s a great tip for people out there that are just starting to use these tools where where you can quickly get into what we call slack overload, where literally you’re looking at 14 channels, you’re supposed to be checking on all like and looking at, because because everybody’s including it, yeah, and you don’t really want that, you want the information that’s super relevant for you. And it’s important for you so you’re only involved in those things. But the other things that you don’t check them because those notifications can draw you out of work on regular basis. And as we all know, productivity is about not getting away from your focus?

Doug Bolger 10:01
Yeah, I think one of the best parts is bricks with slack really started to combine together into something because you aren’t included in everything like that allows you to focus that gives you a distraction free work environment to actually get your work done. Yet, you know that when you’re doing something, it’s going to be recognized and seen by other people. So it’s, it’s really giving you that little hit of like, Oh, I matter here. So you have this strong sense of inclusion. Well, at the same time, you’re not always receiving all the information, which is interesting to have both exists at the same time. And that’s probably leadership for the future. I would argue that’s not going away.

Tom Lyons 10:48
I would agree. Okay, well, let’s let’s move into a little bit of self promotion here and still try and stay relevant for people at the same time. And we run two programs we run Save the Titanic, and we run, Lead the Endurance. Both of these are leadership programs that I think are super relevant in this time because Save the Titanic was this crisis within a limited amount of time they had to save lives before the ship sunk. And we’re in a time right now where, where literally a crisis hit, there’s a limited amount of time to make decisions about what’s best for your company and get everybody rallying and moving in the right direction. We’ll maybe dig into a little bit about the lessons there. You don’t want to give anything away about the program. So I gotta put that challenge out there for you don’t don’t give away too much. But talk a little bit about that.

Doug Bolger 11:35
Well, the interesting thing about Save the Titanic is it’s been, we designed it 25 years ago, and that program continues to be relevant over and over and over again. And the the thing that I think makes it relevant is you’ve got a short amount of time and in there you have to make choices and what you choose to do and how you choose to interact as a leadership team, as a team as leaders really impacts what’s possible. So if you’re in that data gathering place where I need all the data, you’re, you’re likely going to have a learning experience rather than a result. And if you’re the kind of person who’s like jumped in with both feet, let’s go during the torpedoes. You may also have a leadership, experience and insight from that. So it really is the diversity of your team coming together, each of us layering on top what we know and our strengths, that allows us in that environment to create this sort of brain trust that gets everybody involved and connected and building on top of each other’s ideas, which leads to a different type of thinking because I can think my way you think your way, you put those two ways together, we’re stronger You put six eight people’s brains together and show them how to do it, which is, in essence, what they learn and Save the Titanic is how do you pull group together and get the best out of everyone to produce these miraculous outcomes?

Tom Lyons 13:15
Yeah. Yeah. To quickly come to consensus on on the best ideas. Right. And while learning, now we use a couple tools to do that, I think it’s probably okay to talk about those. You’ve already mentioned the Brain Trust, Brain Trust is a mentoring circle where everybody comes together and you focus on one particular problem as a group, you decide which problem that’s going to be and then everybody doesn’t necessarily give their solution they give their experience to, that’s the key.

Doug Bolger 13:43
That is the key. And that’s what transforms that. I think we’ll see. Like already the research is showing us that peer mentoring is quite often more relevant, then most of what learning and development is offering inside of organization. Big, so why not engage in that inside the learning and development space? Let’s take the most effective process and apply it inside learning and development where we’re applying new leader development skills.

Tom Lyons 14:17
That’s right. And then the other tool that we like to use, and you’ve shown it, right, we’re doing this as our layering tool called Yes and… the whole point of that is, is you toss out a specific question. And then as soon as you’ve given out your thought on it, I go, yes, acknowledging what you’ve said, right? And then and build on it with my suggestion, or whatever. And then I tossed that idea we we use physical metaphor of tossing the ball, but really it’s just passing the idea onto another person. They acknowledge with another Yes. Right and then and add their idea on it. super powerful tool for quickly brainstorming new ideas and getting past blockages of ideas right?

Doug Bolger 15:04
Yeah, I, to me that I call it Brain Sharing. I like that brain sharing aspect of it because really, I imagine you’re building a wall and you’ve got that again brick, one person leaves brick, another person leaves brick, another person leaves brick, and you keep stacking all these pieces on together. And eventually the team goes, we built that wall it’s not my wall it’s not your wall and gets rid of again that exclusion factor and drives that home I’d like we built this together. Well, let me think here. Hmm. If we built our action plan together, would we all be more committed to doing it than listening to a leader or coming back from you know, or had this start this weekend? Let’s go this direction. That leadership style, which I sometimes practice, my name is Doug I sometimes have that I think are really great. You all of a sudden other people can be like, okay, yes. And how would that layer on top of what we’re already doing? And yes, and haven’t we already designed three programs that already do that? Yes. And Couldn’t we leverage all that stuff and we’d already be done? Yeah,yes. And that’s a good thing.

Tom Lyons 16:30
Okay, so to finish off, a lot of people are going through a lot right now, especially with the stress of figuring out what to do with their business. In this time change. What is your closing advice for those people? What should they be thinking about doing?

Doug Bolger 16:49
So I think first and foremost is you’ve got to find time to get your team together and have a conversation about where you are. And daily check ins I think are really powerful and valuable. Our teams getting great traction out of that just seeing each other’s faces, we get these images of teams getting together, and they’re all holding their coffee cup. And I think the biggest thing is, the world has changed. It’s it’s changed already. It’s not changing. It’s changed. So now it’s time to find inside of you. What are you going to do? What’s your stand inside this conversation for your team? So how do you get them together? How do you get them aligned? How do you get them engaged? And that’s why these tools now are so powerful, because that’s really what we’re doing inside these experiences is showing people here’s how you do it, and we do it in zoom. We do it in any platform. It doesn’t the platform’s irrelevant. We’re all focused on our new platform. In a way we’ve been using zoom for years. We’re Using zoom, there’s nothing, that part of the equation just allows you to hide from dealing with the part that’s important, which is, okay, what are we doing? How do we do this better? How Who are we supporting? Who are we supporting? How are we going to do it? Where our clients at? How are we going to get out and connect and still deliver the value that all of us want to do everyone out there, even if they’re furloughed? They want to contribute?

Tom Lyons 18:31
Okay, then. Okay. Thank you, everybody, for joining us. If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to us on any of our channels, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, email, the website, all of those work we have the old phone style works as well. You can get a hold of us that way. Even if you’re just looking for some advice on how to move forward in this time.

 

WHO’S LEARN2?

We’re Learn2, and it’s our mission to change the way the world works. We would love for you to join us in that mission. Here’s what to do, see this link?  It’s for a quick 10 question assessment that will give you deep insight into your natural communication style. You’re going to love it. You need to do it, click the link and take the assessment, trust me. After that I really hope you’ll consider working with us, we create amazing results for our clients and would love the opportunity to do the same for you.

12 Keys to Creating an Engagement Culture

12 Keys to Creating an Engagement Culture

Engagement Culture

A company’s culture is the shared values, beliefs and behaviors that determine how people do things in an organization. A team’s culture, while aligned with the larger organizational culture, can often look very different across the organization, and pocket cultures may emerge. 

In the midst of organizational change and restructuring, these pocket cultures may collide, and the fallout can be disastrous or, at the very least disheartening. Keep issues related to blending team cultures a top priority and take these steps to ensure a smooth transition. 

 

 

  1. Plan ahead. Long before any change announcement is made, identify who will be impacted and how. Don’t leave it to chance – plan process, communication, measurement, and results.  
  2. Choose the cultural agenda. What is the result you want to see emerge from the combination of the multiple teams? How does this relate to the unique culture that each team brings? The new structure may follow one pocket culture more closely or may create a blend of cultures. Bottom line…define it. Define what it will look like and what it means to processes, individuals and outcomes.  
  3. Find the pain points, the opportunities and the strengths from multiple perspectives and build your plan around these. 
  4. Diagnose the similarities and differences that matter to determine which gaps need to be closed as you merge. Use interviews, focus groups, accountability mapping, process flow mapping, observation or surveys to gather critical feedback.  
  5. Anticipate and expect a few bumps. Senior leaders can find themselves in the uncomfortable position of watching the problem unfold without knowing what to do about it. Ask questions openly and honestly and listen for the answers, sometimes even when you don’t ask the questions.  
  6. Involve the employees in the rollout and the vision – Co-create the new culture focusing on the areas of similarity that matter with the newly formed team. Highlight and recognize the areas of similarity as the team moves forward together.  
  7. Use the strengths of both teams to choose and declare what to bring forward and what to leave behind. There may be things that don’t work with the expected outcomes of the newly created team, and letting the team declare this will help them own the new future vision. We have done this effectively on a Graffiti Wall in a Merging Teams Workshop called Inspire the Future
  8. Communicate often / frequently with all. People will be uncertain in the face of change. Frequent, targeted communication will help to build confidence and ensure people are on track as they move forward together.  
  9. Leverage opportunities to bring the teams together socially and operationally. Set the stage with opportunities for the new team to naturally play together and work together to solve a challenge using the multiple perspectives to achieve success.   
  10. Measure progress along the way. Once you have identified the key measures of cultural and operational success, measure the progress. When you measure it, you have the opportunity to dig deeper, follow up and keep building. More than just annual measurement, use frequent touchpoints to keep the top issues and opportunities top of mind. Help your team to see the improvements as you move forward together.  
  11. Celebrate successes together. Highlight the successes related to outcomes. Declare how the team worked together to accomplish the successes – both operationally and culturally.  
  12. Emerging culture is as important as emerging results – often, we pay attention to the financials and efficiencies gained…we need to devote equal attention to measuring the people analytics. Use a Cultural Integration Assessment Tool to close the loop on merging the cultures. Using these tools, leaders manage and measure how people are adapting their beliefs and behaviors, thereby measuring outcomes and the probability that the behaviors will show positive returns. 

WHO’S LEARN2?

We’re Learn2, and it’s our mission to change the way the world works. We would love for you to join us in that mission. Here’s what to do, see this link?  It’s for a quick 10 question assessment that will give you deep insight into your natural communication style. You’re going to love it. You need to do it, click the link and take the assessment, trust me. After that I really hope you’ll consider working with us, we create amazing results for our clients and would love the opportunity to do the same for you.

4 Tips for Increasing Collaboration

4 Tips for Increasing Collaboration

Here are 4 tips to improve collaboration:

1. Introducing a needs impact identifier to understand the desired outcome for the event – move beyond the focus on budget and timing.

Break down exactly what it is you need and communicate it clearly to your vendor. Most likely, your vendors have run across similar needs and as a result, have some great solutions or ideas.

2. Planning to include time for collaboration and innovation – short timelines and a focus on limited budget restricts idea generation that might achieve more.  

When you place time for collaboration into your planning, you create new opportunities and creativity. Including your vendor in the preparation also adds more mental diversity and increases brainpower around an idea, brainpower and experience you don’t need to hire.

3. Increasing communication – even a one-liner email indicating that there is no news can improve relationships.

Collaboration is born of trust and strength of the relationship. When you start treating your vendors and suppliers as valued team members, you gain more assets to solve more problems. Leadership requires doing more with less, which means bringing in allies to help solve problems or accomplish goals. Your vendor’s teams are resources that can often be utilized at a low cost.  

4. Using positive reinforcement to reward and encourage good behaviour – say thank you with impact by indicating how good work affected the outcome.

We often think of vendors and suppliers thanking us for purchasing their product. That’s a short-sighted view of any relationship. The reality we trade money for value. The relationship between the teams should show gratitude both ways. When your vendors help solve a real problem, thank them, they will be much more likely to help you in the future, much more likely to collaborate to solve complex problems. When you stop thinking of them as someone you buy things from and start considering them as an off-site team, you’ll find you can extend the capabilities of your team dramatically.

WHO’S LEARN2?

We’re Learn2, and it’s our mission to change the way the world works. We would love for you to join us in that mission. Here’s what to do, see this link?  It’s for a quick 10 question assessment that will give you deep insight into your natural communication style. You’re going to love it. You need to do it, click the link and take the assessment, trust me. After that I really hope you’ll consider working with us, we create amazing results for our clients and would love the opportunity to do the same for you.

9 Principles for Increasing Engagement through Learning

9 Principles for Increasing Engagement through Learning

It takes an inspired leader to inspire a team. While incentives and time off reward and reinforce extrinsic reasons to engage, intrinsic motivations have a more significant impact.

Imagine the competitive advantage of two companies that—in essence—deliver the same product. One company’s employees are engaged and inspired to innovate and transform their tasks. The other company’s employees complete the tasks without being personally invested. The two companies would produce wildly different results.

Your approach to learning & leading is key to engagement

The way employees learn either disconnects or creates meaningful connections that spur engagement. The engagement level in your learning environment determines how much of that learning gets applied in the actual work environment. The following principles guide you to cause engagement, which transforms culture:

MAKE THE LEARNER RESPONSIBLE.

As a facilitator, consider the fact that if you are responsible, then your learners are not accountable. Start finding ways to cause active participation and start holding participants responsible for their learning and the application of that learning.

STOP SPEAKING; START HEARING.

When participants speak, learning is more likely to happen. Participants forget more than 90 percent of what you say within days, yet connect emotionally to their peers’ comments. Start HEARing them: Hint at connections; ask for Elaboration or Examples; offer Affirmation by agreeing, encouraging, or praising; and Reflect to connect to how they could apply what they learned.

USE NARRATIVE IMMERSION:

Narrative Immersion is the process of allowing participants to be part of the story. Stories on their own increase retention and are a primal part of how humans create community. When you make the participants a character in the story, engagement skyrockets along with retention and application. Being told, sold, or lectured to decreases learner esteem and increases passiveness. Start liberating learning by offering real problems to solve; allow all answers to be valid; time their ability to produce results; and leverage competition to generate the best application back to work. You can do that with a program centered around Narrative Immersion.

START WITH PARTICIPANTS SPEAKING.

Start every learning experience with the participants finding their voice through sharing their best practices, challenges, or conditions in which they apply the skills to be learned.

STOP COACHING.

Move the focus from your ability to coach to developing the participants’ ability to coach each other. Start asking participants to identify and give feedback to their peers. Identification and feedback skills become necessary abilities to implement the learning insights back at work. Start building the skills and tools required for application to shift engagement from the learning environment to the workplace.

SAY GOOD-BYE TO POWERPOINT.

Relying on PowerPoint illustrates a lack of preparation and understanding of your content — which causes disengagement. Start designing learning to give the participants the content and let them discover and invent links to their workplace.

STOP USING BINDERS.

Binders illustrate your commitment to content rather than learning. Content is not value. Learning is value, so focus on fewer concepts and more application to increase engagement inside and outside the learning environment. Start focusing on application during the learning, so participants learn to apply the content rather than just remember the material. Application trumps all other learning. Choose the conditions, environments, and tasks where the learning will be used and build application challenges.

TEACH MULTIPLE SKILLS AT A TIME.

Skills no longer get applied one at a time. Participants operate in complex situations with multiple skills, so stop teaching one skill at a time. Start integrating various skills into activities, so participants are better prepared for real-life situations.

FIND VALUE IN LEARNING.

Start following the participants’ desire to find value in the learning. When participants connect, then follow the connection and encourage application. Your willingness to ensure relevance to the participants will be rewarded with engagement.

Engagement comes before application. And the application of learning is where your participants and your organization receive a return on investment. Follow the above principles to increase the engagement and discover a new level of application of learning. High engagement and application environments increase participants’ ability to adapt to their changing situation and increases the ability to innovate. The result—engagement cascades throughout the organization.

What are the best programs to engage a team?

- 100% Participation and application = Save the Titanic Immersive Experience
- Strategic Planning and Big Picture = Lead the Endurance Immersive Experience
- Communication and Leadership Skills = Communicate Naturally

 

To Know, Or Not To Know – That Is The Question

To Know, Or Not To Know – That Is The Question

Knowing and Doing Think back to the last conversation you had with someone when they said “I know” in response to a comment you made. You know darn well the other person thinks he/she ‘knows’ what you just shared, and it could not be farther from the truth. Why is that? Because as Destin Sandlin once said, “Knowledge does not equal understanding.”  Knowledge is far off from understanding, and even farther away from “doing” and applying what you know.   So how do you move from knowing something (a process, a concept, an idea) through to applying it skillfully? That is the ‘million dollar’ question. A question educators, facilitators and leaders have struggled with through the ages. We often hear in the halls of learning, “well I told them, so they should know how to do it.” It’s that kind of response that sets me ablaze, and we will address here.   In order to move from “knowing” to “doing”, we need to look at the brain, not the rational part of the brain that holds the facts but the emotional part of the brain that manages feelings, the amygdala. To get to “doing” we need to recognize three main concepts; first, you decide to move from “knowing” to “doing”, then you need to make the “doing” achievable and finally recognize that honey catches more flies. 

Decide To Move 

Often on inner dialogue sounds something like this “what if I fail, what if I get this wrong, what if I do it differently, what if I can’t remember?” and so on and so on. We have not even decided to move, and our inner saboteurs are shooting us down. First thing first, recognize that these are just that, saboteurs that are trying to protect us.   Actually, the saboteurs are rooted in our amygdala, our lizard brain. This part of the brain is hardwired to keep us alive, and it often does that by keeping us in the same patterns we are used to. The amygdala creates a flight, fight or freeze reaction in our body when we are under stress. And in life and death situations, this reaction is very helpful. It helps us jump out of the way of an accident or run away from a lion without needing to think “this is dangerous”.  When it comes to taking “knowing” to “doing”, this amygdala gets in the way. This new way does not feel safe and easy, so the amygdala sends out fear signals. The first step is to recognize them for what they are, signals, as you are experiencing something new.   Also, if you find yourself doubting this movement from “knowing” to “doing”, gut-check it with your values and beliefs. Does this new learning align with your values and beliefs, then move forward into the unknown of developing a new skill by “doing”. 

Make “Doing” Achievable 

How do you eat an elephant? Well, one bite at a time, of course. (No elephants were hurt in the creation of his blog.)  This elephant principle also applies to learning how to “do”. If possible, break the new “doing” down to smaller bites. Perhaps the process can be accomplished in stages, or the new skills can be practiced in small bites. Give yourself room to stumble, fail and even fall on your face. As Denzel Washington once said, “I want to fall… forward. At least I figure that way I’ll see what I’m about to hit.”  As you practice these new skills and rewire your brain into thinking new ways, celebrate the steps and little wins along the way.  

Honey Catches More Flies

Here is where the amygdala comes back in again. Our brain is wired to move away from pain and toward gain, hence fight, flight or freeze. The SCARF model best describes the five domains that influence our behaviour:  

  1. Status – our relative importance to others. 
  2. Certainty – our ability to predict the future. 
  3. Autonomy – our sense of control over events. 
  4. Relatedness – how safe we feel with others. 
  5. Fairness – how fair we perceive the exchanges between people to be. 

Which one do you relate most with? Once you know which one triggers you, you can then use that to create a reward system to motivate you. If you are triggered by status and don’t want others to see you stumble at something new, then hire a coach and work on those new skills ‘off-line’ to maintain your perceived status. If certainty is important to you then ask to get involved in this new change so you are in control rather than reacting. If autonomy is valuable to you then choose the time when you use this new skill. If relatedness is important, then find a peer group or “Brain Trust” and work on it together. If fairness is a driving factor, then create a support group for others feeling “off” as a result of learning new things.  In order to stay ahead of the game in this ever-changing world, we all need to take what we know and put in into action to turn “knowing” into “doing”. You do that by deciding to move, making it doable and using honey to catch the flies.   Want to learn more about SCARF and other leadership principles, reach out to Learn2 at info@learn2.com and follow us on LinkedIn and Facebook.  

Why Do Immersive Experiences Create Better Leaders?

Why Do Immersive Experiences Create Better Leaders?

Leadership Development

Why Leadership Develop?

Leadership Development is the ultimate grey zone. The black and white, done or not done thinkers nemesis. It is one of the longest-lasting verbs in one’s professional career. The goal, of course, is to be a great leader – so great in fact that fully competent replaces “developing” as soon as possible with a gold star and the search for some other achievement. Sadly, that is not how it works, ask any non-gold star carrying leader.

Leadership development is the ultimate challenge for any organization’s Senior Leadership staff and Human Resources teams. That’s because we know something that many of you do not. It’s not a secret exactly, its just a frequently overlooked or entirely ignored fact. All roads lead to leadership. That’s right, business going well over a period of time? It’s the Leader (s). Business having challenges? It’s the Leaders. So what to do? There are basically 3 levels of leadership development, general knowledge, specific programs and lived experiences. Knowing that you are never done, there is only one direction to proceed – Forward. Here’s how they break down.

There is no shortage of information on leadership principles and behaviours…several authors and speakers have survived the test of time, including Jim Collins, Brene Brown and Simon Synek. The format doesn’t matter much…book, tedTalk, podcast, they all do the trick. They all offer an insight into something that you probably already knew and had forgotten. Occasionally there are some new insights. They sharpen our focus and get us excited about leading again. Many of us will even take some of these “new” ideas and test them out. This is good leadership knowledge, and well worth the read, watch or listen. It’s not exactly leadership development. However, it does inform, inspire and educate. The influence is impactful in the moment, and largely short-lived as there is little consideration given to how to apply the learning to your current situation.

Next is the myriad of leadership programs available, ranging from 4 hours to 4 years. Most of these are module centred and focus on leadership competencies, including performance management, communication, delegation, etc. These are typically available in medium and large-sized organizations, and they are intended to go deeper than information only as they often have peer accountability, role-playing and project/ homework components built-in. Leadership programs vary widely in there use of adult learning principles and design, content and follow-though. Typically, leadership development programs work well in the moment and often have a modest level of “application” built-in. There is little evidence to support longer programs having longer or more impactful results.

The one variable is the extent to which Senior Leaders participate and practice the same leadership program as the full leadership/management team. When the FULL leadership team participates and adopts the language, behaviours and supports, the impact of the program is greatly enhanced. I often wonder if this would be the case without a “program”. In other words, I wonder if leadership skills and behaviours would increase organically if all leaders used a common, consistent and intentional language and set of behaviours that were supported and required. Would this give us a similar result? In other words, do we need more knowledge or do we need more consistent and intentional behaviour? Is leadership development simply the reinforcement of good leadership habits over time? Perhaps. It doesn’t explain why some leaders fail in certain circumstances – specifically tough circumstances or long tenures.

The final area of leadership development is the lived experience. Simply put, with knowledge, awareness, commitment and practice, many leaders learn the skills they need on the job through any combination of trial and error, observation, desperation, circumstances, aspiration and opportunity. Many of the best leaders have never taken a leadership course or finished a book (podcasts and TedTalks are 20-minute investments often combined with commuting or the treadmill). So how can organizations fast track the lived experience approach? We know it works; however, it takes too long – we can’t wait for the living to produce good leaders.

The answer is the immersive leadership experience.

The immersive experience is a controlled, well designed, intense lived experience that happens over a few hours. It creates an environment that is focused, uncomfortable, challenging, stressful and entirely memorable. The combination lays down information in the brain that results in a combination of fast-tracked learning, a vivid experience and lasting results. The immediate debrief, and connection to the Leader’s real-world fuses the learning, the experience and the application immediately with lasting results. The impact of decisions, communication, behaviour, and direction is immediate and real – even when you know you are in a simulated environment, the brain responds and remembers as if the situation is real because the experience is real.

Leadership Development is a critical and continuous process. A great leader is never fully developed, and they know it even when others do not. Every organization knows that leadership skills are essential, and most invest as they are able. My experience is this. Keep working at it. Learn all you can. Invest in good programs that your senior teams participate in. Practice and learn as you go. If you want to fast track all of that, invest in immersive experiences that put people in unimaginable leadership roles. They will remember, learn and change for the good.

WHO’S LEARN2?

We’re Learn2, and it’s our mission to change the way the world works. We would love for you to join us in that mission. Here’s what to do, see this link?  It’s for a quick 10 question assessment that will give you deep insight into your natural communication style. You’re going to love it. You need to do it, click the link and take the assessment, trust me. After that I really hope you’ll consider working with us, we create amazing results for our clients and would love the opportunity to do the same for you.

Blog Fulllwidth

Learn2 Lead – Alan Booth – Advisory Partner – Deloitte Canada

Learn2 Lead – Alan Booth – Advisory Partner – Deloitte Canada

How has COVID-19 impacted Chatham-Kent Health Alliance and what helped them prepare?

 

Podcast:

Transcipt:

Doug Bolger 0:04
So Laurie, you’ve been through our Learn2 Save the Titanic program. How has it prepared you for the Covid-19 crisis?

Lori Marshall 0:14
So I think the Learn2 Save the Titanic program was really a great example of exactly what we’re going through. The first thing that I would observe is that going into the Titanic simulation, everybody knows how that actual real event ended. And so you go into it with a particular paradigm and thinking how it’s gonna happen. And I know that you probably wouldn’t do anything differently than the people who were in the situation. And so I think with respect to the pandemic, in North America, we had the advantage of knowing about the situations in China, in Italy and in healthcare, that’s what we were bracing for and preparing for. And so we basically went in trying to save the passengers when we think about the Titanic and saving the passengers in the ship. So we put all of our effort into saving the acute care facilities, decanting patients, moving patients from the hospital out into long term care, stopping elective surgeries, creating more capacity where we’ve never had it before, in order to be able to anticipate this huge crush of individuals who would need to be admitted for care. And about, you know, a few weeks into it. What we then realized was that the social distancing was making a difference in terms of who was showing up doors, and that, in fact, all of the efforts that we had been putting into creating more and more capacity, were perhaps focused on a different area than where the real issue was now. And for us now, it’s in congregate settings. It’s in long term care, it’s in retirement homes. It’s in shelters, it’s places where people are living. Living closely together where the transmission is happening, and then some with some devastating impacts there. So for me that was very much like the state of the Titanic where we put all of our efforts into trying to save the passengers. And then all of a sudden, we had this aha moment. Well, if we could save the ship, we ended up saving all of the passengers. So there’s been a major pivot, I would say, in terms of healthcare, with respect to moving away from creating more and more capacity in the acute care sector, and moving now more towards how do we help and support those vulnerable populations.

Doug Bolger 2:33
So in terms of your leadership team, and that ability to build on top of each other and really focus in from an idea and translating it into an action has that ability of driving from idea to action impacted how you’ve operated throughout the crisis?

Lori Marshall 2:55
I think that driving from idea to action has been on steroids. Right now, it truly has been this experience itself. I have a relatively new team to one another, some who’ve been here a long time, and others who really just joined the organization. And it’s incredible to me how quickly a crisis galvanizes everyone together, you very quickly come to what the actions are you implement, you move on to the next one. And what I would say is, it was a change for us as hospitals, we normally be very risk averse. We tend to ruminate over decisions a lot. It’s hard for us to do rapid cycle improvement and then move on to something else. And I think this experience has been such that some of the advice we were hearing, particularly I would say from New York, was that, you know, don’t wait around for the perfect solution. Time is what you have to act on right now. If you wait for the perfect solution, it will be too late. And so, you know, we probably put something in place where normally we would say no, we would never ever do that. And we pivoted when we needed to. So I think it actually was a tremendous team building experience unto itself. And now, what we’re going to have to do, though, is to think about when you move out of a pandemic, you can’t stand the command and control kind of structure. And so that I think is going to be a challenge for not only us, but for funders for governments who have enjoyed for this period of time and ability to make and enact decisions very quickly. And you can only do that for that short period of time based on the fact that prior to that you’re very consultative, and afterwards there’s the social contract that you’re going to return to that kind of decision making environment. So That’s going to be the challenge and the shift to know when to make that piece is is going to be a challenge for us.

Doug Bolger 5:07
And I think for a lot of people when they think of COVID, they think of just the human loss and the tragedy. And yet, there’s also a triumph inside of this of galvanizing your team together, doing what’s impossible. How has your team shifted from that tragedy into the triumphs? What are some of the wins that you guys have done?

Lori Marshall 5:33
I think one of the things we’ve done really well in this is communicate. And I for me, that’s a major challenge and one where we’ve had daily memos going out to all of our staff, there are huddles, we’re on the radio four times a week with different radio shows communicating with the community. And it is really it hasn’t just galvanized, I would say our intellect senior leadership team it’s galvanized the entire hospital. And so you know things like if a lights on in an office late at night somebody knocking that door just to check in and how are you? Right? I those kinds of things in a normal environment probably wouldn’t be happening. But there is very much this caretaking, I would say that has happened within the full organization. And people are saying thank you to one another. And it’s, it’s really very heartening to see.

Doug Bolger 6:34
And have you been able to prevent this spread locally?

Lori Marshall 6:40
So I think our community’s actually done very well. We’ve had very, very few cases in the community. We’ve only ever had a total of four admissions to the hospital and a population size of 100,000 people. We’ve worked very well with our public health organization. In, in our community, and that partnership, some of the decisions that have been made there to close down some things earlier than other jurisdictions, I have, I think actually made quite a difference. We’ve had no outbreaks in the organization, so no transmission from patients to staff or staff to staff, which again, helps us in terms of people feeling confident, and their safety is being looked after safety is one of our values. And we’ve gone out of our way, I would say to make sure that staff and physicians know that that’s our commitment to them, we are not going to send them into an unsafe situation. And that gives them the confidence of knowing that they can care for patients the way that they do.

Doug Bolger 7:46
Well, we’d be remiss if we didn’t say thank you, because I know quite often, being the CEO is a thankless job and your leadership has certainly protected your community and prepared your hospital. allowed that group to galvanize around and just on behalf of all of us, the community and the business world and society at large thank you to you and your team for everything you’ve done.

Lori Marshall 8:14
Thank you

WHO’S LEARN2?

We’re Learn2, and it’s our mission to change the way the world works. We would love for you to join us in that mission. Here’s what to do, see this link?  It’s for a quick 10 question assessment that will give you deep insight into your natural communication style. You’re going to love it. You need to do it, click the link and take the assessment, trust me. After that I really hope you’ll consider working with us, we create amazing results for our clients and would love the opportunity to do the same for you.

Learn2 Lead – Alan Booth – Advisory Partner – Deloitte Canada

Learn2 Lead – Learn2 Lead – Lori Marshall – President and CEO of Chatham-Kent Health Alliance

How has COVID-19 impacted Chatham-Kent Health Alliance and what helped them prepare?

 

Podcast:

Transcipt:

Doug Bolger 0:04
So Laurie, you’ve been through our Learn2 Save the Titanic program. How has it prepared you for the Covid-19 crisis?

Lori Marshall 0:14
So I think the Learn2 Save the Titanic program was really a great example of exactly what we’re going through. The first thing that I would observe is that going into the Titanic simulation, everybody knows how that actual real event ended. And so you go into it with a particular paradigm and thinking how it’s gonna happen. And I know that you probably wouldn’t do anything differently than the people who were in the situation. And so I think with respect to the pandemic, in North America, we had the advantage of knowing about the situations in China, in Italy and in healthcare, that’s what we were bracing for and preparing for. And so we basically went in trying to save the passengers when we think about the Titanic and saving the passengers in the ship. So we put all of our effort into saving the acute care facilities, decanting patients, moving patients from the hospital out into long term care, stopping elective surgeries, creating more capacity where we’ve never had it before, in order to be able to anticipate this huge crush of individuals who would need to be admitted for care. And about, you know, a few weeks into it. What we then realized was that the social distancing was making a difference in terms of who was showing up doors, and that, in fact, all of the efforts that we had been putting into creating more and more capacity, were perhaps focused on a different area than where the real issue was now. And for us now, it’s in congregate settings. It’s in long term care, it’s in retirement homes. It’s in shelters, it’s places where people are living. Living closely together where the transmission is happening, and then some with some devastating impacts there. So for me that was very much like the state of the Titanic where we put all of our efforts into trying to save the passengers. And then all of a sudden, we had this aha moment. Well, if we could save the ship, we ended up saving all of the passengers. So there’s been a major pivot, I would say, in terms of healthcare, with respect to moving away from creating more and more capacity in the acute care sector, and moving now more towards how do we help and support those vulnerable populations.

Doug Bolger 2:33
So in terms of your leadership team, and that ability to build on top of each other and really focus in from an idea and translating it into an action has that ability of driving from idea to action impacted how you’ve operated throughout the crisis?

Lori Marshall 2:55
I think that driving from idea to action has been on steroids. Right now, it truly has been this experience itself. I have a relatively new team to one another, some who’ve been here a long time, and others who really just joined the organization. And it’s incredible to me how quickly a crisis galvanizes everyone together, you very quickly come to what the actions are you implement, you move on to the next one. And what I would say is, it was a change for us as hospitals, we normally be very risk averse. We tend to ruminate over decisions a lot. It’s hard for us to do rapid cycle improvement and then move on to something else. And I think this experience has been such that some of the advice we were hearing, particularly I would say from New York, was that, you know, don’t wait around for the perfect solution. Time is what you have to act on right now. If you wait for the perfect solution, it will be too late. And so, you know, we probably put something in place where normally we would say no, we would never ever do that. And we pivoted when we needed to. So I think it actually was a tremendous team building experience unto itself. And now, what we’re going to have to do, though, is to think about when you move out of a pandemic, you can’t stand the command and control kind of structure. And so that I think is going to be a challenge for not only us, but for funders for governments who have enjoyed for this period of time and ability to make and enact decisions very quickly. And you can only do that for that short period of time based on the fact that prior to that you’re very consultative, and afterwards there’s the social contract that you’re going to return to that kind of decision making environment. So That’s going to be the challenge and the shift to know when to make that piece is is going to be a challenge for us.

Doug Bolger 5:07
And I think for a lot of people when they think of COVID, they think of just the human loss and the tragedy. And yet, there’s also a triumph inside of this of galvanizing your team together, doing what’s impossible. How has your team shifted from that tragedy into the triumphs? What are some of the wins that you guys have done?

Lori Marshall 5:33
I think one of the things we’ve done really well in this is communicate. And I for me, that’s a major challenge and one where we’ve had daily memos going out to all of our staff, there are huddles, we’re on the radio four times a week with different radio shows communicating with the community. And it is really it hasn’t just galvanized, I would say our intellect senior leadership team it’s galvanized the entire hospital. And so you know things like if a lights on in an office late at night somebody knocking that door just to check in and how are you? Right? I those kinds of things in a normal environment probably wouldn’t be happening. But there is very much this caretaking, I would say that has happened within the full organization. And people are saying thank you to one another. And it’s, it’s really very heartening to see.

Doug Bolger 6:34
And have you been able to prevent this spread locally?

Lori Marshall 6:40
So I think our community’s actually done very well. We’ve had very, very few cases in the community. We’ve only ever had a total of four admissions to the hospital and a population size of 100,000 people. We’ve worked very well with our public health organization. In, in our community, and that partnership, some of the decisions that have been made there to close down some things earlier than other jurisdictions, I have, I think actually made quite a difference. We’ve had no outbreaks in the organization, so no transmission from patients to staff or staff to staff, which again, helps us in terms of people feeling confident, and their safety is being looked after safety is one of our values. And we’ve gone out of our way, I would say to make sure that staff and physicians know that that’s our commitment to them, we are not going to send them into an unsafe situation. And that gives them the confidence of knowing that they can care for patients the way that they do.

Doug Bolger 7:46
Well, we’d be remiss if we didn’t say thank you, because I know quite often, being the CEO is a thankless job and your leadership has certainly protected your community and prepared your hospital. allowed that group to galvanize around and just on behalf of all of us, the community and the business world and society at large thank you to you and your team for everything you’ve done.

Lori Marshall 8:14
Thank you

WHO’S LEARN2?

We’re Learn2, and it’s our mission to change the way the world works. We would love for you to join us in that mission. Here’s what to do, see this link?  It’s for a quick 10 question assessment that will give you deep insight into your natural communication style. You’re going to love it. You need to do it, click the link and take the assessment, trust me. After that I really hope you’ll consider working with us, we create amazing results for our clients and would love the opportunity to do the same for you.

Learn2 Lead – Impact on Engagement and Diversity with Unlimited Talent

Learn2 Lead – Impact on Engagement and Diversity with Unlimited Talent

When employees can find jobs globally and employers can find talent globally what happens to employee engagement and diversity?

We find out in this episode of Learn2 Lead.

 

Podcast:

Transcipt:

Tom Lyons 0:04
Hi, everybody, it’s Tom Lyons here from Learn2 and I’m here with, with Mary who is our consultive expert on all things HR and culture. And I’m here with Samantha who is our account manager. For Learn2, she looks after some of our greatest clients, which are all of them. Today, I wanted to take the time to talk about impact on home working, that’s something that we’re doing a lot of, and the mental health of that impact with your team because there are a lot of changes going on. So to dig into it, teams have been working remotely, we’ve been seeing that a lot. And we see the impact. with everybody of not being as social as what they could actually be like we’re all tied at home, we don’t get to visit our friends. What we don’t see or what we haven’t seen is the impact of needing to take on watching the kids still trying to get your work done needing to do extra shopping for your parents and grandparents. There’s all these extra things that have been taken on. Start with Mary, how do you help employees through that? Because it’s a big change for them?

Mary Bean 1:04
Yeah. I think the first thing is to acknowledge it. So that this is not like working from home? Because I can, because I want to, it’s because we have to. And all those things you mentioned, Tom Absolutely Right. So most people are dealing with home schooling kids, but actually doing homeschooling with their kids and the workload. And in some cases, the workload has increased. Other times it has just it has decreased or often has just shifted in the context of COVID. And there are also this additional stressor, it’s a we are all under this latent, constant level of unrest, I’m sure does have anxiety in anybody. So that’s true forever, all of us. So productivity levels are impacted by that. And if you add that into anybody who has already existing challenges with feeling anxious, this just escalates even further, and anybody who still has a job is certainly feeling very grateful that they have one. And they’re also wondering, do I have one tomorrow or weeks time or a month’s time? How fast? I think the first thing is just acknowledging that and adjusting timelines and expectations accordingly,

Tom Lyons 2:15
Really good time to bring out that empathy skill. And we talked about that as a leadership skill all the time. But now is the real time to pull that empathy out and go there are there are things going on that I’m probably not completely aware of. And I need to be sensitive even even in that ignorance of what I don’t know. Right, and that there are other things to go, which means I’ve got to talk to my people. I’ve got to talk to my teams. I’ve got to find out what’s going on in their personal life and then figure out how we work around those sort of things. Yeah, that sort of hits pretty close with you, Sam, because you’ve got a lot of things going on. I mean, we know that you have a young daughter, we know that you’ve got lots of pets. You’ve got a husband that’s been at home for a while, but you’ve been seeing this with your clients. You can see it with your co workers. What’s your perspective.

Samantha Schumyn 3:02
My perspective is we didn’t expect this, we expected this pandemic to last a week or two.

So in those first couple of weeks, people were excited to have to work. A Yeah, I get to work from home.

We’re moving, we’re changing. It’s exciting. And then that leg effect comes right? You’ve got all this adrenaline, you’ve got all this. Go, go go. And now it’s kind of like, Oh, this is our new normal. And just going back to what you said earlier, Tom, I had a call with a client earlier today and she really hit the nail on the head and said, How are you dealing as a human through all of this? So yes, we have all our skills and but how is how is humanity coming out of this? So I have really noticed a shift in clients. Definitely a lot of my clients have kids, so yes, very You’re right. I’m doing a call at 10 o’clock at night. I’m I have clients with a kid bouncing on their bed. We have, you know, people working in the gardens in thier everything and people keep apologizing. And I think we need to come to a point where this is normal. They get through it. If you need to have that class one at 10 o’clock meeting, go for it. If you have a screaming kid in the background, I get it. You know, how can we support each other? What are your strong moments? What are not my strong moments? And how can we come together and again, a human word to work through at all.

Tom Lyons 4:32
That’s a really good point. I noticed. I noticed a lot of stories coming out in video meetings lately, because you’re right, one of their kids comes running into the room, or the dog comes running into the room. We see a lot more pets in the video conferences than we do and people seem to be sorry for that. But the reality is, is life is meshed like this really tightly right now. And so we have to have the expectation that it’s meshed right?

Samantha Schumyn 4:59
Definitely. And you know, Tom, you and I and Mary, you also work from home most of the time. So I have an office not many people have an office since got people like kitchen tables, we’ve got all you know, at wherever they can from the kids, or the kids or they don’t have that structured space of an office. So I’m all for it. I love getting to know every single part of my my clients lives. And I enjoyed the dogs, cats, kids and everything else in between.

Tom Lyons 5:28
Okay, well, let’s move on to culture, culture drives productivity, culture drives innovation, culture drives profit within the company, but this change has this unique effect or impact on culture. People culture used to be defined by how do you bring people together a lot like that’s how people thought of it. And because how they came together, and how you treated them personally together, right? Define how the company worked together. Now they’re not together. What tips can you give for holding a great culture together if you had one, and now it’s hard because the people aren’t together as much. And then if you were, if you’re still trying to create your culture or improve your culture, what tips exist in a remote world to help that happen? And I’ll start with you, Mary.

Mary Bean 6:12
Okay, so two things. One is you’re going to find out real fast, what kind of culture you really have in the world that we’re living in. Now, there’s a lot of room for I’m not doing well. Now, there might have argued that that should always have been the case. I’m not sure that it was. And so some of the lessons that we’re learning now from that human part, hopefully people will actually continue on with those pieces, because that is the part that I think this vulnerability that we we know is important for leadership we know that you choose shows courage and shows the human side of us, we have not had to do that people have chosen to go down that road and certainly the Brene Brown followers would know what I’m talking about. But we haven’t all this is a world even those that are not comfortable has almost been forced into that cultural perspective, I be thinking about what are you intentional about? And what are you consistent about? I have a client that talks about this all the time. And I shamelessly borrowed those two words from him over the last year being consistent and intentional over and over again. And so in the past, you might have said, Oh, we’ve got a great culture, look around. It’s you know, people are talking working well together. And maybe it just happened that way. And I would say, if it just happened, you got lucky. So good cultures are not done by this, this organic sort of, we’ll just kind of see what happens. It’s an intentional piece, those things are put in place with a mindset to what are what is the vibe that we’re trying to get aligned with our work? Those that have not done that work? It’s not all it’s not lost? If we have to be intentional because we’re not having that bump into you on the way to the lunchroom or the washroom or as we’re entering the building. What do you want to be intentional about? How do we want to start conversations, how do we want to look at our work? We want to adjust our expectations.

Tom Lyons 7:58
How do you measure that because it’s one thing to go, okay, you need to be more intentional about it. You need to go about and make it make an effort to pay attention and be consistent about it. But one, I suspect, you need to create a benchmark around it, right? And then you need to be able to take that benchmark and then measure against it later to see whether or not what you’re doing is having the desired impact just as you would with almost any metric.

Mary Bean 8:22
So you start with the why you start with what is the purpose of like what we’re trying to do here? Everybody says the same thing. We want better communication, we want better collaboration, okay, what does that mean for us. We always start with? How are you doing? Expectation is a combined expectation. If I’m the leader, it isn’t just up to me, I’ve included in this case, both Tom and Sam, and what I’m intending to do, and I’m going to say, look, it’s not my habit, but I’m really going to work hard at just checking in with you first. And so at a meeting, if I don’t do that, please remind me I want to I’m really trying to make a habit change here. So you just you just say it,

Tom Lyons 8:58
There is a level of authenticity that It goes along with it too, because otherwise, the response that comes back is well, how are you doing? I’m fine, right? Because an individual won’t be vulnerable with you unless as their leader, you’re at least authentic to some degree on that. They believe that you’re asking because you truly care about their well being as opposed to checklist.

Mary Bean 9:17
That’s right. So you could ask a simple question like, how’d you sleep last night? It was a beautiful day here. Did you go for a walk yesterday. There are questions you can ask that aren’t so personal that you’ve overstepped. But if somebody’s not getting a good night’s sleep, and not getting some level of walk, even people walk from the GO train or the subway or their car, they’re not doing any of those things, right. So are you getting outside? Could you have a walking meeting? Could we say listen, let’s have a conversation and let’s both put on our headphones and our put our phones in our pockets. Nice world we are living in right and go for a walk together and have our conversation then right. So change it up a little bit.

Tom Lyons 9:53
Let’s talk about how the other day Mary and I we were having a specific talk about a topic and it was around how work in the remote world is going to change the talent pool. And it changes the employment options people have. So there’s this flip side, now companies have this choice, that if they realize that they can be productive, and they can get stuff done with remote workers, you don’t have to hire geographically close to you. You could hire in a different country, you could hire in a different state, you could hire in a different province, you could hire in a different city. You don’t have to just take the resumes that come your way. But the flip side to that and for companies too, is that employees have more options now to as soon as companies realize that you can have remote workers, I can apply to somebody in Los Angeles if I live in New York, and I don’t have to move to Los Angeles. Right? I can be working in a small town in Ontario, Canada, and I can work for a company down in Florida. What does the world start to look like for teams and industry?

Samantha Schumyn 11:00
And this is why resume versus hiring for fit is so good. When people when you’ve opened up that, that pool of knowledge, you know, these are the certain amount of people I have. And I’m sure they are really great. It’s going back to culture, what is your culture? And how are you hiring perfect, so that conversations flow easy. standards at the company can be easy, you know, this is why it’s important to learn to, you need to fit in with it and I know need sounds like a really strong word. It’s just that when there are times like this pandemic, it’s easier to shift. It’s gonna be difficult to everyone else. And we still have the same values. Family is important downtime is important and pivoting to a new normal is important, and we’re all on that same path. So I love the idea of being able to open up that that hiring pool. The more the merrier if you think about it, and you have access to great talent out there, all over the world.

Tom Lyons 12:07
So Mary, does that change diversity, diversity, in part was driven also by geographic, geographical or demographical I should say, democratical makeup of the area. In fact, some company’s policies around diversity hiring are based on the same to have the same number of diversity that exists within their demographic area. Right? Well, if you’re, if you’re a pool now is the entire world. You pretty much have to throw that type of policy out and go, we’re hiring. We’re hiring based on a different type of need or a different type of style of diversity.

Mary Bean 12:48
I mean, we’ll see. I mean, diversity is really as core differences, be some differences, we see other differences we experience. I think the other piece will be the harder probably inclusion So that if you have a growth mindset and a diversity mindset that you want differences, you probably already have that. And maybe if you live in a homogeneous community, that now you have opportunity to hire beyond that, because not to be actually in your, in your four walls. That’s great. And but now inclusion becomes a bigger issue. So inclusion is think about diversity as I got the invitation to the party, but when I got there, I got invited to dance like that’s inclusion that’s the difference. So that how do I people feel included in the context of those pieces? Right? So yes, we’re different. How do I get involved with those pieces? Especially so for somebody who’s sitting a little bit on the outside of that you may have somebody who’s not working full time all the time, or is somebody who you work with and you bring out certain projects, how do you have them feel they’re part of the whole team,

Tom Lyons 13:47
You can’t have benefit from diversity, if you don’t have inclusion, because you can have as a diverse group is possible but if they do not feel included, if they do not feel valued, they’re probably going to just leave, right? That’s just a given. If I don’t feel I’m valued and included, then I’m going to leave. But if they’re not included, they’re not going to share. They’re not going to provide the mental diversity that you’re trying to create, which is what drives innovation. All the companies that are good at this have fantastic innovation because they have all these different minds thinking in different ways coming up with different solutions for different problems, you don’t get that if they’re not included.

Mary Bean 14:27
If they’re different and separate, then you haven’t, elevated the differences. You’ve just said, you’re different. You’re different than I am, and I’ve hired you great, but we haven’t got a good understanding of how those differences are going to help move the business forward. And if we don’t have that connection, it’s not just applied knowledge. You can have a lot of knowledge about something but if you can’t make that work for your organization, it’s not worth very much.

Tom Lyons 14:52
Sam and we’ve covered a lot of stuff today. What for you, what are the first steps that companies need to do to prepare for The changes that are still coming, lots of changes already happened. There’s more changes still to come. And then what do you do now for the changes that have already occurred?

Unknown Speaker 15:08
Great question, Tom. And I think that goes back to the beginning of our conversation is values, you know, is everybody you know your values and is your big picture. So the thing is, your company’s still driving towards the same goals. It’s now more than ever important to have great leaders are your leaders able to lead in these times of change, everybody wants a message from the top, the top is still the top. And that top has the different layers of leaders underneath to drive those teams. So it’s really important not to have that strategy of the new normal, get that value, get that culture set up and speak to your team, ask for that feedback. Now figure out that why go back to that why. And then work on your what and you’ll

Mary Bean 15:55
know about some of the indicators that you run your business that helped you know, with Things are changing and pay attention to those. I wouldn’t worry about what’s going to happen later. I’m worried about think about what’s happening now. Yeah, that’s all we can control right now is where we’re at. And it’s a super hard thing for those of us that are like, used to planning out and we got, we all had plans before this happened. And so it’s like, go back and look at those plans, or any of those plans still fall in the context of COVID in my business.

Tom Lyons 16:22
Okay, well, this was fan. Fantastic. Thank you both for taking the time and good luck. We’re all busy. We got lots going on. But I think this is important information to get out there. So I appreciate you guys taking the time with me to answer those questions.

Unknown Speaker 16:33
Thanks, Tom.

WHO’S LEARN2?

We’re Learn2, and it’s our mission to change the way the world works. We would love for you to join us in that mission. Here’s what to do, see this link?  It’s for a quick 10 question assessment that will give you deep insight into your natural communication style. You’re going to love it. You need to do it, click the link and take the assessment, trust me. After that I really hope you’ll consider working with us, we create amazing results for our clients and would love the opportunity to do the same for you.

Learn2 Lead – Putting Impact First With Leadership Skills

Learn2 Lead – Putting Impact First With Leadership Skills

What happens when you treat leadership skills like hard skills and design your programs around the impact you are trying to create.

We find out in this episode of Learn2 Lead.

 

Podcast:

Transcipt:

Tom Lyons 0:04
Hi e verybody, it’s Tom Lyons here from Learn2 and we’re here with Carrie Millen our lead facilitator and Doug Bolger, our CEO. Many of you know him as well. And we’re here to talk about soft skills and specifically about soft skills and impact. For instance, if I was trying to learn to type, I would either take a course, I would get some software, I would then go in and I would practice it, and I would be able to measure it. And I would know when I’m becoming competent with that skill, but with soft skills, we see a completely different approach. Why is that?

Carrie Millen 0:34
Great question, Tom. Often that is because learning and development, if you think about how or why their teams were originally created, and how it’s very much back in the industrial age, you created a skill ultimately to help with safety and they were very focused on the end result. Now often learning gets direction from up top that we need to develop leadership skills and they aren’t given the difference. So they try to put in many great pieces that they think together without having that direct line to what’s the real impact in the business? Because in most cases, the business actually doesn’t know what that impact is. They just know they need it

Doug Bolger 1:14
Without being clear on what the outcome is the terminal outcome in our language, like, are we raising dollars per FTE? Unless you have that measure and metric, your leadership development is literally just sprayed without a focus

Tom Lyons 1:32
It’s like we know we need leadership skills. But if it was any other skill, there’d be an assessment it would be we need this specific thing to accomplish this specific thing. So you touched on that a little bit and I’d like you to go a little deeper, if you can.

Doug Bolger 1:44
Yes, said differently on the assessment, I would say it’s like, what’s the gap? What’s being measured, like in this leadership program, we want to impact this by this amount by this date. So incredibly clear our million dollar Leadership Program, that one that’s now been adopted into the nine digital modules. That program literally has you pick, here’s the impact I want to make, here’s how I’m going to measure it. And so we don’t even consider that most of the time in the learning and development, talent development hypo programs, we go in to focus in on the person and to me that’s developing leadership, versus helping people learn to lead by actually leading to an actual outcome.

Tom Lyons 2:37
So Carrie, I’m gonna ask, I’m gonna direct this one directly to you. Okay, in our industry. Yep. Over the last several years, we’ve seen this increase in in companies saying that we are spending a lot on leadership development. We feel like a lot of it is going down the drain. And I think it’s a big part of that is because we don’t put impact first and then tie what type of learning needs to go to drive that impact? So what do you think the biggest challenge is for companies to overcome that tendency?

Carrie Millen 3:11
I think the biggest way to overcome that tendency is, is for learning and development to learn how to actually take a backseat in this and actually put the ownership on the learners. Often, you know, we said they don’t do an assessment, often, an assessment is done, and we get a high level I want to do this, but there’s no connection to me as a learner. Learning and development needs to actually get out of the way and realize you hired amazing freaking employees, give them the power and the ownership to make a difference. And the tools to in turn make that difference. Then you will see it drive performance. And so it’s a real mind shift and change in responsibility because they used to be police in control, and now they hold the space for other people to learn and make that impact.

Doug Bolger 4:00
I think that’s well said, I think the the challenge for us is that we most the people in our industry, we believe in the inherent value of helping people and supporting people and developing people, which is great. And then you have a crisis like this that comes along where people are just like, well, that’s great, but it’s actually not going to help us achieve our business outcomes. And that’s, I think the root of some of our challenges is we’ve been focused on the content. And we keep telling and developing content, buying content, really, you want to focus on the process.

Tom Lyons 4:40
It’s this concept of competence, right where people don’t leave a classroom competent they leave a classroom knowledgeable.

Carrie Millen 4:49
And, Tom to add on to what you said, it’s, it’s applying those skills and getting up to a competence level and most importantly, learning how to recover and recover without an instructor. Getting over you to telling you what the keystrokes you’re supposed to have. Being able to self recover and use your peers is so important.

Tom Lyons 5:06
Let’s move to something super relevant right now, which is leadership development. But it’s one thing to talk about development and leadership skills. Like two months ago, it’s another thing to talk about leadership development skills in this crazy world right now, like this level of uncertainty that so many companies are going through what change has to occur, both in leadership development, and what change has to occur in the way that we lead in this new environment.

Carrie Millen 5:34
I alluded to it a little earlier. Ownership is a huge portion you used to have your staff here, now your staff are all spread apart. They’re keeping the ship afloat, probably working more hours than they were before. And really want a purpose, really want a reason to be there. So giving them that ownership and that empowerment to make a difference. On top of giving them the skills to be able to do that. That’ll create their own little businesses that their own running, they’re driving forward with that kind of activity. It’s that ownership. A, you don’t have to control it all. They’re amazing. Allow them to make ripple effects within the business.

Doug Bolger 6:16
I would say that there’s never been a time where we’re more CEO of our own role. Now we’re really intentional about how we organize our time who’s on the call, what’s the purpose of the call? What’s the outcome of the call? So I think we’re seeing a lot more intention and getting clear. Which ties back to Carrie’s point of like, what is the purpose? And right now, the main things I think leaders have to do is just get a super clear purpose.

Tom Lyons 6:47
This is a real opportunity, though, because for engagement to occur, you would think it’s the opposite because they’re they were moving them outward, but Carrie really hit it on the head, where now you have this chance to engage them in an and make them understand their role is actually really important. They have a strong purpose within the company that maybe they didn’t feel before because they were more controlled, right?

Carrie Millen 7:10
Absolutely. Often it’s out of sight out of mind, what an incredible opportunity is now to get noticed by a lot of people in the business. And also when you make an impact, and you are lower down in the hierarchy of a company, not only does that impact help me in my performance for the year, it helps my manager, skip leader and up, it actually has a huge cascading impact. It’ll help our team and so much more.

Doug Bolger 7:35
You’re speaking to like a program we ran on Wednesday, one of the participants went in and said the impact I want to make is I want to fix this process. It doesn’t work. Well what’s the impact of that throughput is going to increase dramatically. And number of amount of rework is going to change dramatically. This lead with which we’re able to service, an upset or frustrated customer is going to shorten dramatically. You walk out with three core measures on a project you’ve just implemented and annualize those savings into the tune of millions of dollars, you’re going to get noticed by not just your leader, your leader’s leader, because everyone up through that chain to the executives is going to hear about your leadership, your future inside that organization. It’s different now.

Tom Lyons 8:34
So pulling this back in, what closing advice do you have for companies regarding both leading and their leadership programs today, their leadership development programs, what should they do?

Doug Bolger 8:44
Focus in on the process of actually producing impact. And that means that all the content stuff that all these leadership development, people want to give a lot of that needs to fall away and it needs to be become outcome focused with measurement and a lot of accountability. That means you can move to that very quickly.

Carrie Millen 9:09
Trust that you hired amazing people and they’re super talented. And just give them a few of the tools and they’re gonna build the future that you want.

Tom Lyons 9:18
Completely. Okay, my closing advice. Call us! Call Learn2, that is my advice for you. We we know how to do that assessment. We know how to help you through those those problems. We know how to create the impact that you’re looking for out of your leadership development. We have the programs that work online in a world where you can’t bring them together. We have those solutions. So my advice is call us. Okay. Thank you.

Carrie Millen 9:44
Thanks a lot.

Doug Bolger 9:45
Thanks, Tom.

WHO’S LEARN2?

We’re Learn2, and it’s our mission to change the way the world works. We would love for you to join us in that mission. Here’s what to do, see this link?  It’s for a quick 10 question assessment that will give you deep insight into your natural communication style. You’re going to love it. You need to do it, click the link and take the assessment, trust me. After that I really hope you’ll consider working with us, we create amazing results for our clients and would love the opportunity to do the same for you.

Learn2 Lead – Building Inclusion with Remote Teams?

Learn2 Lead – Building Inclusion with Remote Teams?

Transcipt:

Tom Lyons 0:05
So welcome to Learn2. We’re doing a video podcast today, talking a little bit about what’s happening in the world. Absolutely crazy stuff with Covid 19. Numbers are still, of course rising with the virus here. But the impact on businesses has been dramatic to say the least. I can’t say that. So I’m here with Doug Bolger, CEO of Learn2, to talk a little bit about how this is impacting one our company, of course, and things that we’re doing and then what it’s doing for our clients, and then maybe a little bit of advice from you on what you think should be happening. How’s that sound?

Doug Bolger 0:41
Sounds great. So what’s happening in our business, about three years ago, we started shifting our core product Learn2 Save the Titanic over to digital as we started to see things happening globally, as the infections increased by country by country, we, we started putting our finishing touches on that program and got that pushed out.

Tom Lyons 1:10
What are some of the unique challenges that we now face, Learn2 and then face our clients? Maybe they haven’t seen because this is a little bit different than a normal unique recession, right?

Doug Bolger 1:24
Yes, this one’s different. I think for most of us, we’ve been wondering about what does the new world of work look like? And I would argue it’s probably now arrived or a good portion of it has arrived. So people have been talking about this for many years, but people spending more time on conference calls, video conferencing, augmented reality, virtual reality, artificial intelligence, all of these things. These trends have been in place. We’ve seen them in our clients. Now we’re seeing them in our data. Today experienced as leaders and struggling with how do we lead inside these new platforms? How do we think differently? How do we engage our teams differently? How do you leverage your team and get them motivated and inspired to be able to go and do something and you don’t have that face to face or that pull everyone into the conference room moment? So we’re just seeing a lot of clients struggling to get their heads wrapped around? How am I going to do development? How do I set up a simple as a report back most a lot of report backs or conference calls or face to face? Now it’s how do I report back over a platform and what’s that look like? And how do I do it effectively?

Tom Lyons 2:53
Yeah, we used to have this ability, especially in open offices, which became so popular is that you can literally poke your head out You can see everybody that’s there. And you can kind of just walk down the hall and you can say, Hey, how’s it going? what’s, what are you working on? What’s the status of that project? But with everybody being dispersed at this point in time and being in different locations, that ability gets diminished. And now a new form of management needs to take place. So what do you think that looks like?

Doug Bolger 3:21
Well, we’ve been living in it for a while because we have team members in six different locations. I guess seven? If you count home office? Yeah. We, we’ve seen things like, you know, used to put up a flip chart on the wall or a schedule, all those things have gone away. So we’re seeing that shifting into digital. I think we’re even just seeing different behaviors like so we we have something called Beer 30. You don’t have to drink beer, but we all get in zoom. And you can see everyone’s face and we’ve renamed ourselves what we were drinking. I was Green tea. I think you were

Tom Lyons 4:01
Diet Coke. Yeah,

Doug Bolger 4:03
We had a few people who were like knuckleball tried different things. So we had some fun with it half an hour, just face to face, no agenda, just letting people talk. And letting people connect. those connections now are infinitely more important. The implications of exclusion. Is, is I think, just in the future is going to be unbelievable. So this inclusivity How do leaders create inclusivity inside their team where people want to contribute, they feel like that’s their role is to actually contribute. Otherwise, you’re not getting those random bumping into someone. Oh, by the way, guess what’s happening? I thought I’d let you know. I it’s got to be much more intentional now.

Tom Lyons 4:53
Yeah, that was something that as an organization we journey through ourselves because we are different. First across the entire country, and half of the workforce is actually in an office, the other half is somewhere else and being able to not disclude somebody because you don’t see them. Right? This out of sight, out of mind thing had to become an ever present concept for us. Right?

Doug Bolger 5:16
Yes. And and new behaviors then pop up like really thinking about who is this? How is someone implicated? Or what’s the impact on someone of not knowing this information? We created a #bricks channel, that’s been super helpful. We’re always building for new clients. It’s just we’ve been doing it for 30 years. So we’re constantly building these larger, visionary kind of pieces for clients. So because of that, it’s kind of like Rome and Rome was not built in a day. So each brick is acknowledged for being valuable. So we built this #bricks channel that was all about hey, I put these bricks and so everyone was up to date on the bricks. And then we realized that, really the brick is the outcome. And while that’s important, the real brick is I’m making a contribution. And I want to have that contribution recognized. And as certainly as Canadians or North Americans, it’s not always easy for us to go like, look at my brick my bricks, Oh, awesome. It’s a cornerstone brick, we’re going to build this huge thing on this. So what we did was we shifted the intention of the bricks channel to start to recognize other people for laying the bricks. That was transformative for our team.

Tom Lyons 6:42
Yeah, it allowed me It allowed myself to recognize somebody else for something they’ve done for me, or maybe they’ve done for the company, or whatever. So I’m gonna break that down a little bit for the people watching this. When we talked about a bricks channel, we use an application called slack. I think many of you will be familiar with it, but there’s Microsoft teams, Yammer, tools that allow teams to be able to chat remotely and be able to quickly connect via video or by audio. So we use slack and in that we created a channel called hashtag bricks. And and anytime somebody needs to be able to toss a brick out there, they just go to that channel, they toss it out, it’s company wide, so everybody can see it, right? And come and take a look at it. And then everybody tosses an emoji on it, or they make a comment or something like that. And it ends up making people feel really good. Normally, that would happen in the office. And people would say, hey, great job on that. Whatever. But when you’re when you’re dispersed when you’re remote, it was a really transformative thing for organization.

Doug Bolger 7:42
Yeah, I wouldn’t even say like, it’s one of the first things you look at when you go in as soon as you see there’s a brick there. You’re like, Oh, is it me? Who is it and you know, will pile on on the bricks to where like, you know, Carrie has done something that’s really helped someone else in your life. Yeah. And we start having emojis and comments you can also so that leadership is really about creating this culture that allows for us to feel that level of connection. feel included. Often inclusion is this big concept. Really, it comes down to some versus all. Either you’re included or you’re not. And inside being included, that means everyone is included, not some people. So that distinction really is helped us really start to wrap our heads around. And at the same time, you have to balance that off with not everybody needs to be included in every update. every choice. We’ve also had to go. Is this a 411? Is this a 711? Is this a 911 that helps people understand the level of urgency and we’ve organized into channels so that you If you’re involved with a client, you get all the updates on that client. Some of us just have marginal involvement with a client at a specific space and time so we can step out, which has been really effective for just keeping everyone in the know. And included and connected, it’s clearly not always perfect. It’s way better than it was before we started using.

Tom Lyons 9:25
And I think that’s a great tip for people out there that are just starting to use these tools where where you can quickly get into what we call slack overload, where literally you’re looking at 14 channels, you’re supposed to be checking on all like and looking at, because because everybody’s including it, yeah, and you don’t really want that, you want the information that’s super relevant for you. And it’s important for you so you’re only involved in those things. But the other things that you don’t check them because those notifications can draw you out of work on regular basis. And as we all know, productivity is about not getting away from your focus?

Doug Bolger 10:01
Yeah, I think one of the best parts is bricks with slack really started to combine together into something because you aren’t included in everything like that allows you to focus that gives you a distraction free work environment to actually get your work done. Yet, you know that when you’re doing something, it’s going to be recognized and seen by other people. So it’s, it’s really giving you that little hit of like, Oh, I matter here. So you have this strong sense of inclusion. Well, at the same time, you’re not always receiving all the information, which is interesting to have both exists at the same time. And that’s probably leadership for the future. I would argue that’s not going away.

Tom Lyons 10:48
I would agree. Okay, well, let’s let’s move into a little bit of self promotion here and still try and stay relevant for people at the same time. And we run two programs we run Save the Titanic, and we run, Lead the Endurance. Both of these are leadership programs that I think are super relevant in this time because Save the Titanic was this crisis within a limited amount of time they had to save lives before the ship sunk. And we’re in a time right now where, where literally a crisis hit, there’s a limited amount of time to make decisions about what’s best for your company and get everybody rallying and moving in the right direction. We’ll maybe dig into a little bit about the lessons there. You don’t want to give anything away about the program. So I gotta put that challenge out there for you don’t don’t give away too much. But talk a little bit about that.

Doug Bolger 11:35
Well, the interesting thing about Save the Titanic is it’s been, we designed it 25 years ago, and that program continues to be relevant over and over and over again. And the the thing that I think makes it relevant is you’ve got a short amount of time and in there you have to make choices and what you choose to do and how you choose to interact as a leadership team, as a team as leaders really impacts what’s possible. So if you’re in that data gathering place where I need all the data, you’re, you’re likely going to have a learning experience rather than a result. And if you’re the kind of person who’s like jumped in with both feet, let’s go during the torpedoes. You may also have a leadership, experience and insight from that. So it really is the diversity of your team coming together, each of us layering on top what we know and our strengths, that allows us in that environment to create this sort of brain trust that gets everybody involved and connected and building on top of each other’s ideas, which leads to a different type of thinking because I can think my way you think your way, you put those two ways together, we’re stronger You put six eight people’s brains together and show them how to do it, which is, in essence, what they learn and Save the Titanic is how do you pull group together and get the best out of everyone to produce these miraculous outcomes?

Tom Lyons 13:15
Yeah. Yeah. To quickly come to consensus on on the best ideas. Right. And while learning, now we use a couple tools to do that, I think it’s probably okay to talk about those. You’ve already mentioned the Brain Trust, Brain Trust is a mentoring circle where everybody comes together and you focus on one particular problem as a group, you decide which problem that’s going to be and then everybody doesn’t necessarily give their solution they give their experience to, that’s the key.

Doug Bolger 13:43
That is the key. And that’s what transforms that. I think we’ll see. Like already the research is showing us that peer mentoring is quite often more relevant, then most of what learning and development is offering inside of organization. Big, so why not engage in that inside the learning and development space? Let’s take the most effective process and apply it inside learning and development where we’re applying new leader development skills.

Tom Lyons 14:17
That’s right. And then the other tool that we like to use, and you’ve shown it, right, we’re doing this as our layering tool called Yes and… the whole point of that is, is you toss out a specific question. And then as soon as you’ve given out your thought on it, I go, yes, acknowledging what you’ve said, right? And then and build on it with my suggestion, or whatever. And then I tossed that idea we we use physical metaphor of tossing the ball, but really it’s just passing the idea onto another person. They acknowledge with another Yes. Right and then and add their idea on it. super powerful tool for quickly brainstorming new ideas and getting past blockages of ideas right?

Doug Bolger 15:04
Yeah, I, to me that I call it Brain Sharing. I like that brain sharing aspect of it because really, I imagine you’re building a wall and you’ve got that again brick, one person leaves brick, another person leaves brick, another person leaves brick, and you keep stacking all these pieces on together. And eventually the team goes, we built that wall it’s not my wall it’s not your wall and gets rid of again that exclusion factor and drives that home I’d like we built this together. Well, let me think here. Hmm. If we built our action plan together, would we all be more committed to doing it than listening to a leader or coming back from you know, or had this start this weekend? Let’s go this direction. That leadership style, which I sometimes practice, my name is Doug I sometimes have that I think are really great. You all of a sudden other people can be like, okay, yes. And how would that layer on top of what we’re already doing? And yes, and haven’t we already designed three programs that already do that? Yes. And Couldn’t we leverage all that stuff and we’d already be done? Yeah,yes. And that’s a good thing.

Tom Lyons 16:30
Okay, so to finish off, a lot of people are going through a lot right now, especially with the stress of figuring out what to do with their business. In this time change. What is your closing advice for those people? What should they be thinking about doing?

Doug Bolger 16:49
So I think first and foremost is you’ve got to find time to get your team together and have a conversation about where you are. And daily check ins I think are really powerful and valuable. Our teams getting great traction out of that just seeing each other’s faces, we get these images of teams getting together, and they’re all holding their coffee cup. And I think the biggest thing is, the world has changed. It’s it’s changed already. It’s not changing. It’s changed. So now it’s time to find inside of you. What are you going to do? What’s your stand inside this conversation for your team? So how do you get them together? How do you get them aligned? How do you get them engaged? And that’s why these tools now are so powerful, because that’s really what we’re doing inside these experiences is showing people here’s how you do it, and we do it in zoom. We do it in any platform. It doesn’t the platform’s irrelevant. We’re all focused on our new platform. In a way we’ve been using zoom for years. We’re Using zoom, there’s nothing, that part of the equation just allows you to hide from dealing with the part that’s important, which is, okay, what are we doing? How do we do this better? How Who are we supporting? Who are we supporting? How are we going to do it? Where our clients at? How are we going to get out and connect and still deliver the value that all of us want to do everyone out there, even if they’re furloughed? They want to contribute?

Tom Lyons 18:31
Okay, then. Okay. Thank you, everybody, for joining us. If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to us on any of our channels, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, email, the website, all of those work we have the old phone style works as well. You can get a hold of us that way. Even if you’re just looking for some advice on how to move forward in this time.

 

WHO’S LEARN2?

We’re Learn2, and it’s our mission to change the way the world works. We would love for you to join us in that mission. Here’s what to do, see this link?  It’s for a quick 10 question assessment that will give you deep insight into your natural communication style. You’re going to love it. You need to do it, click the link and take the assessment, trust me. After that I really hope you’ll consider working with us, we create amazing results for our clients and would love the opportunity to do the same for you.

12 Keys to Creating an Engagement Culture

12 Keys to Creating an Engagement Culture

Engagement Culture

A company’s culture is the shared values, beliefs and behaviors that determine how people do things in an organization. A team’s culture, while aligned with the larger organizational culture, can often look very different across the organization, and pocket cultures may emerge. 

In the midst of organizational change and restructuring, these pocket cultures may collide, and the fallout can be disastrous or, at the very least disheartening. Keep issues related to blending team cultures a top priority and take these steps to ensure a smooth transition. 

 

 

  1. Plan ahead. Long before any change announcement is made, identify who will be impacted and how. Don’t leave it to chance – plan process, communication, measurement, and results.  
  2. Choose the cultural agenda. What is the result you want to see emerge from the combination of the multiple teams? How does this relate to the unique culture that each team brings? The new structure may follow one pocket culture more closely or may create a blend of cultures. Bottom line…define it. Define what it will look like and what it means to processes, individuals and outcomes.  
  3. Find the pain points, the opportunities and the strengths from multiple perspectives and build your plan around these. 
  4. Diagnose the similarities and differences that matter to determine which gaps need to be closed as you merge. Use interviews, focus groups, accountability mapping, process flow mapping, observation or surveys to gather critical feedback.  
  5. Anticipate and expect a few bumps. Senior leaders can find themselves in the uncomfortable position of watching the problem unfold without knowing what to do about it. Ask questions openly and honestly and listen for the answers, sometimes even when you don’t ask the questions.  
  6. Involve the employees in the rollout and the vision – Co-create the new culture focusing on the areas of similarity that matter with the newly formed team. Highlight and recognize the areas of similarity as the team moves forward together.  
  7. Use the strengths of both teams to choose and declare what to bring forward and what to leave behind. There may be things that don’t work with the expected outcomes of the newly created team, and letting the team declare this will help them own the new future vision. We have done this effectively on a Graffiti Wall in a Merging Teams Workshop called Inspire the Future
  8. Communicate often / frequently with all. People will be uncertain in the face of change. Frequent, targeted communication will help to build confidence and ensure people are on track as they move forward together.  
  9. Leverage opportunities to bring the teams together socially and operationally. Set the stage with opportunities for the new team to naturally play together and work together to solve a challenge using the multiple perspectives to achieve success.   
  10. Measure progress along the way. Once you have identified the key measures of cultural and operational success, measure the progress. When you measure it, you have the opportunity to dig deeper, follow up and keep building. More than just annual measurement, use frequent touchpoints to keep the top issues and opportunities top of mind. Help your team to see the improvements as you move forward together.  
  11. Celebrate successes together. Highlight the successes related to outcomes. Declare how the team worked together to accomplish the successes – both operationally and culturally.  
  12. Emerging culture is as important as emerging results – often, we pay attention to the financials and efficiencies gained…we need to devote equal attention to measuring the people analytics. Use a Cultural Integration Assessment Tool to close the loop on merging the cultures. Using these tools, leaders manage and measure how people are adapting their beliefs and behaviors, thereby measuring outcomes and the probability that the behaviors will show positive returns. 

WHO’S LEARN2?

We’re Learn2, and it’s our mission to change the way the world works. We would love for you to join us in that mission. Here’s what to do, see this link?  It’s for a quick 10 question assessment that will give you deep insight into your natural communication style. You’re going to love it. You need to do it, click the link and take the assessment, trust me. After that I really hope you’ll consider working with us, we create amazing results for our clients and would love the opportunity to do the same for you.

4 Tips for Increasing Collaboration

4 Tips for Increasing Collaboration

Here are 4 tips to improve collaboration:

1. Introducing a needs impact identifier to understand the desired outcome for the event – move beyond the focus on budget and timing.

Break down exactly what it is you need and communicate it clearly to your vendor. Most likely, your vendors have run across similar needs and as a result, have some great solutions or ideas.

2. Planning to include time for collaboration and innovation – short timelines and a focus on limited budget restricts idea generation that might achieve more.  

When you place time for collaboration into your planning, you create new opportunities and creativity. Including your vendor in the preparation also adds more mental diversity and increases brainpower around an idea, brainpower and experience you don’t need to hire.

3. Increasing communication – even a one-liner email indicating that there is no news can improve relationships.

Collaboration is born of trust and strength of the relationship. When you start treating your vendors and suppliers as valued team members, you gain more assets to solve more problems. Leadership requires doing more with less, which means bringing in allies to help solve problems or accomplish goals. Your vendor’s teams are resources that can often be utilized at a low cost.  

4. Using positive reinforcement to reward and encourage good behaviour – say thank you with impact by indicating how good work affected the outcome.

We often think of vendors and suppliers thanking us for purchasing their product. That’s a short-sighted view of any relationship. The reality we trade money for value. The relationship between the teams should show gratitude both ways. When your vendors help solve a real problem, thank them, they will be much more likely to help you in the future, much more likely to collaborate to solve complex problems. When you stop thinking of them as someone you buy things from and start considering them as an off-site team, you’ll find you can extend the capabilities of your team dramatically.

WHO’S LEARN2?

We’re Learn2, and it’s our mission to change the way the world works. We would love for you to join us in that mission. Here’s what to do, see this link?  It’s for a quick 10 question assessment that will give you deep insight into your natural communication style. You’re going to love it. You need to do it, click the link and take the assessment, trust me. After that I really hope you’ll consider working with us, we create amazing results for our clients and would love the opportunity to do the same for you.

9 Principles for Increasing Engagement through Learning

9 Principles for Increasing Engagement through Learning

It takes an inspired leader to inspire a team. While incentives and time off reward and reinforce extrinsic reasons to engage, intrinsic motivations have a more significant impact.

Imagine the competitive advantage of two companies that—in essence—deliver the same product. One company’s employees are engaged and inspired to innovate and transform their tasks. The other company’s employees complete the tasks without being personally invested. The two companies would produce wildly different results.

Your approach to learning & leading is key to engagement

The way employees learn either disconnects or creates meaningful connections that spur engagement. The engagement level in your learning environment determines how much of that learning gets applied in the actual work environment. The following principles guide you to cause engagement, which transforms culture:

MAKE THE LEARNER RESPONSIBLE.

As a facilitator, consider the fact that if you are responsible, then your learners are not accountable. Start finding ways to cause active participation and start holding participants responsible for their learning and the application of that learning.

STOP SPEAKING; START HEARING.

When participants speak, learning is more likely to happen. Participants forget more than 90 percent of what you say within days, yet connect emotionally to their peers’ comments. Start HEARing them: Hint at connections; ask for Elaboration or Examples; offer Affirmation by agreeing, encouraging, or praising; and Reflect to connect to how they could apply what they learned.

USE NARRATIVE IMMERSION:

Narrative Immersion is the process of allowing participants to be part of the story. Stories on their own increase retention and are a primal part of how humans create community. When you make the participants a character in the story, engagement skyrockets along with retention and application. Being told, sold, or lectured to decreases learner esteem and increases passiveness. Start liberating learning by offering real problems to solve; allow all answers to be valid; time their ability to produce results; and leverage competition to generate the best application back to work. You can do that with a program centered around Narrative Immersion.

START WITH PARTICIPANTS SPEAKING.

Start every learning experience with the participants finding their voice through sharing their best practices, challenges, or conditions in which they apply the skills to be learned.

STOP COACHING.

Move the focus from your ability to coach to developing the participants’ ability to coach each other. Start asking participants to identify and give feedback to their peers. Identification and feedback skills become necessary abilities to implement the learning insights back at work. Start building the skills and tools required for application to shift engagement from the learning environment to the workplace.

SAY GOOD-BYE TO POWERPOINT.

Relying on PowerPoint illustrates a lack of preparation and understanding of your content — which causes disengagement. Start designing learning to give the participants the content and let them discover and invent links to their workplace.

STOP USING BINDERS.

Binders illustrate your commitment to content rather than learning. Content is not value. Learning is value, so focus on fewer concepts and more application to increase engagement inside and outside the learning environment. Start focusing on application during the learning, so participants learn to apply the content rather than just remember the material. Application trumps all other learning. Choose the conditions, environments, and tasks where the learning will be used and build application challenges.

TEACH MULTIPLE SKILLS AT A TIME.

Skills no longer get applied one at a time. Participants operate in complex situations with multiple skills, so stop teaching one skill at a time. Start integrating various skills into activities, so participants are better prepared for real-life situations.

FIND VALUE IN LEARNING.

Start following the participants’ desire to find value in the learning. When participants connect, then follow the connection and encourage application. Your willingness to ensure relevance to the participants will be rewarded with engagement.

Engagement comes before application. And the application of learning is where your participants and your organization receive a return on investment. Follow the above principles to increase the engagement and discover a new level of application of learning. High engagement and application environments increase participants’ ability to adapt to their changing situation and increases the ability to innovate. The result—engagement cascades throughout the organization.

What are the best programs to engage a team?

- 100% Participation and application = Save the Titanic Immersive Experience
- Strategic Planning and Big Picture = Lead the Endurance Immersive Experience
- Communication and Leadership Skills = Communicate Naturally

 

To Know, Or Not To Know – That Is The Question

To Know, Or Not To Know – That Is The Question

Knowing and Doing Think back to the last conversation you had with someone when they said “I know” in response to a comment you made. You know darn well the other person thinks he/she ‘knows’ what you just shared, and it could not be farther from the truth. Why is that? Because as Destin Sandlin once said, “Knowledge does not equal understanding.”  Knowledge is far off from understanding, and even farther away from “doing” and applying what you know.   So how do you move from knowing something (a process, a concept, an idea) through to applying it skillfully? That is the ‘million dollar’ question. A question educators, facilitators and leaders have struggled with through the ages. We often hear in the halls of learning, “well I told them, so they should know how to do it.” It’s that kind of response that sets me ablaze, and we will address here.   In order to move from “knowing” to “doing”, we need to look at the brain, not the rational part of the brain that holds the facts but the emotional part of the brain that manages feelings, the amygdala. To get to “doing” we need to recognize three main concepts; first, you decide to move from “knowing” to “doing”, then you need to make the “doing” achievable and finally recognize that honey catches more flies. 

Decide To Move 

Often on inner dialogue sounds something like this “what if I fail, what if I get this wrong, what if I do it differently, what if I can’t remember?” and so on and so on. We have not even decided to move, and our inner saboteurs are shooting us down. First thing first, recognize that these are just that, saboteurs that are trying to protect us.   Actually, the saboteurs are rooted in our amygdala, our lizard brain. This part of the brain is hardwired to keep us alive, and it often does that by keeping us in the same patterns we are used to. The amygdala creates a flight, fight or freeze reaction in our body when we are under stress. And in life and death situations, this reaction is very helpful. It helps us jump out of the way of an accident or run away from a lion without needing to think “this is dangerous”.  When it comes to taking “knowing” to “doing”, this amygdala gets in the way. This new way does not feel safe and easy, so the amygdala sends out fear signals. The first step is to recognize them for what they are, signals, as you are experiencing something new.   Also, if you find yourself doubting this movement from “knowing” to “doing”, gut-check it with your values and beliefs. Does this new learning align with your values and beliefs, then move forward into the unknown of developing a new skill by “doing”. 

Make “Doing” Achievable 

How do you eat an elephant? Well, one bite at a time, of course. (No elephants were hurt in the creation of his blog.)  This elephant principle also applies to learning how to “do”. If possible, break the new “doing” down to smaller bites. Perhaps the process can be accomplished in stages, or the new skills can be practiced in small bites. Give yourself room to stumble, fail and even fall on your face. As Denzel Washington once said, “I want to fall… forward. At least I figure that way I’ll see what I’m about to hit.”  As you practice these new skills and rewire your brain into thinking new ways, celebrate the steps and little wins along the way.  

Honey Catches More Flies

Here is where the amygdala comes back in again. Our brain is wired to move away from pain and toward gain, hence fight, flight or freeze. The SCARF model best describes the five domains that influence our behaviour:  

  1. Status – our relative importance to others. 
  2. Certainty – our ability to predict the future. 
  3. Autonomy – our sense of control over events. 
  4. Relatedness – how safe we feel with others. 
  5. Fairness – how fair we perceive the exchanges between people to be. 

Which one do you relate most with? Once you know which one triggers you, you can then use that to create a reward system to motivate you. If you are triggered by status and don’t want others to see you stumble at something new, then hire a coach and work on those new skills ‘off-line’ to maintain your perceived status. If certainty is important to you then ask to get involved in this new change so you are in control rather than reacting. If autonomy is valuable to you then choose the time when you use this new skill. If relatedness is important, then find a peer group or “Brain Trust” and work on it together. If fairness is a driving factor, then create a support group for others feeling “off” as a result of learning new things.  In order to stay ahead of the game in this ever-changing world, we all need to take what we know and put in into action to turn “knowing” into “doing”. You do that by deciding to move, making it doable and using honey to catch the flies.   Want to learn more about SCARF and other leadership principles, reach out to Learn2 at info@learn2.com and follow us on LinkedIn and Facebook.  

Why Do Immersive Experiences Create Better Leaders?

Why Do Immersive Experiences Create Better Leaders?

Leadership Development

Why Leadership Develop?

Leadership Development is the ultimate grey zone. The black and white, done or not done thinkers nemesis. It is one of the longest-lasting verbs in one’s professional career. The goal, of course, is to be a great leader – so great in fact that fully competent replaces “developing” as soon as possible with a gold star and the search for some other achievement. Sadly, that is not how it works, ask any non-gold star carrying leader.

Leadership development is the ultimate challenge for any organization’s Senior Leadership staff and Human Resources teams. That’s because we know something that many of you do not. It’s not a secret exactly, its just a frequently overlooked or entirely ignored fact. All roads lead to leadership. That’s right, business going well over a period of time? It’s the Leader (s). Business having challenges? It’s the Leaders. So what to do? There are basically 3 levels of leadership development, general knowledge, specific programs and lived experiences. Knowing that you are never done, there is only one direction to proceed – Forward. Here’s how they break down.

There is no shortage of information on leadership principles and behaviours…several authors and speakers have survived the test of time, including Jim Collins, Brene Brown and Simon Synek. The format doesn’t matter much…book, tedTalk, podcast, they all do the trick. They all offer an insight into something that you probably already knew and had forgotten. Occasionally there are some new insights. They sharpen our focus and get us excited about leading again. Many of us will even take some of these “new” ideas and test them out. This is good leadership knowledge, and well worth the read, watch or listen. It’s not exactly leadership development. However, it does inform, inspire and educate. The influence is impactful in the moment, and largely short-lived as there is little consideration given to how to apply the learning to your current situation.

Next is the myriad of leadership programs available, ranging from 4 hours to 4 years. Most of these are module centred and focus on leadership competencies, including performance management, communication, delegation, etc. These are typically available in medium and large-sized organizations, and they are intended to go deeper than information only as they often have peer accountability, role-playing and project/ homework components built-in. Leadership programs vary widely in there use of adult learning principles and design, content and follow-though. Typically, leadership development programs work well in the moment and often have a modest level of “application” built-in. There is little evidence to support longer programs having longer or more impactful results.

The one variable is the extent to which Senior Leaders participate and practice the same leadership program as the full leadership/management team. When the FULL leadership team participates and adopts the language, behaviours and supports, the impact of the program is greatly enhanced. I often wonder if this would be the case without a “program”. In other words, I wonder if leadership skills and behaviours would increase organically if all leaders used a common, consistent and intentional language and set of behaviours that were supported and required. Would this give us a similar result? In other words, do we need more knowledge or do we need more consistent and intentional behaviour? Is leadership development simply the reinforcement of good leadership habits over time? Perhaps. It doesn’t explain why some leaders fail in certain circumstances – specifically tough circumstances or long tenures.

The final area of leadership development is the lived experience. Simply put, with knowledge, awareness, commitment and practice, many leaders learn the skills they need on the job through any combination of trial and error, observation, desperation, circumstances, aspiration and opportunity. Many of the best leaders have never taken a leadership course or finished a book (podcasts and TedTalks are 20-minute investments often combined with commuting or the treadmill). So how can organizations fast track the lived experience approach? We know it works; however, it takes too long – we can’t wait for the living to produce good leaders.

The answer is the immersive leadership experience.

The immersive experience is a controlled, well designed, intense lived experience that happens over a few hours. It creates an environment that is focused, uncomfortable, challenging, stressful and entirely memorable. The combination lays down information in the brain that results in a combination of fast-tracked learning, a vivid experience and lasting results. The immediate debrief, and connection to the Leader’s real-world fuses the learning, the experience and the application immediately with lasting results. The impact of decisions, communication, behaviour, and direction is immediate and real – even when you know you are in a simulated environment, the brain responds and remembers as if the situation is real because the experience is real.

Leadership Development is a critical and continuous process. A great leader is never fully developed, and they know it even when others do not. Every organization knows that leadership skills are essential, and most invest as they are able. My experience is this. Keep working at it. Learn all you can. Invest in good programs that your senior teams participate in. Practice and learn as you go. If you want to fast track all of that, invest in immersive experiences that put people in unimaginable leadership roles. They will remember, learn and change for the good.

WHO’S LEARN2?

We’re Learn2, and it’s our mission to change the way the world works. We would love for you to join us in that mission. Here’s what to do, see this link?  It’s for a quick 10 question assessment that will give you deep insight into your natural communication style. You’re going to love it. You need to do it, click the link and take the assessment, trust me. After that I really hope you’ll consider working with us, we create amazing results for our clients and would love the opportunity to do the same for you.

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